II OLYMPIC FOOTBALL TOURNAMENT (STOCKHOLM 1912)

GAME DETAILS

(From 29-06-1912 to 5-07-1912)

 

*NOTE: Due to the scarce, confusing, and sometimes contradictory information about the early Olympic football games, I include the original Olympic reports for each match (only the spelling of players’ names and the syntax has been corrected and edited). In general, goal scorers, scoring times and line-ups are based on these reports; whatever discrepancies with the two other main sources consulted (FIFA and RSSSF) are indicated in the section INCIDENTS.

 

 

FIRST ROUND

STADIUM: Sportplats Traneberg (Traneberg, Stockholm)

DATE: 29-06-1912 (11:00 h)

ATTENDANCE: 600

REFEREE: Hugo Meisl (AUT)

GOALS: 0-1 (Öhman 2’); 1-1 (Bontadini 10’); 2-1 (Sardi 25’); 2-2 (E. Soinio 40’); 2-3 (Wiberg 100’)

INCIDENTS: According to the Olympic report, Wiberg scored the first goal. FIFA tallies the last goal in minute 105. Wickström had to leave the pitch in the second half due to injury.

ITA

Italia

Italy - Finland

Suomi

FIN

2-3 (2-2;2-2)

ITALY

Campelli

Binaschi, De Vecchi

De Marchi (Morelli di Popolo 46’), G. Milano (c), Leone

Zuffi, Bontadini, Berardo, Sardi, Mariani

COACH: Vittorio Pozzo

FINLAND

Syrjäläinen

Holopainen, Löfgren

K. Soinio, E. Soinio (c), Lund

Wickström, Wiberg, Nyyssönen, Öhman, Niska

COACH: —

OLYMPIC REPORT

The first football match of the Fifth Olympiad was favoured, like all the succeeding matches, with brilliant, but, for football, most unsuitably warm weather. The sun was almost unbearably hot but, in spite of this, the game was played at high pressure the whole of the time. Italy kicked off at 11 precisely and at first pressed their opponents hard, but before 2 minutes had elapsed, Wiberg (Finland) got the first goal of the match and the series. By degrees, play was transferred to the middle of the field until, by means of a beautiful attack, Italy came level after 10 minutes’ play, Bontadini scoring for them. Inspired by their success, the southerners now did all they knew, and a fresh goal by Sardi put them ahead and, immediately afterwards, Syrjäläinen was compelled to kneel in order to save a hard, low shot. Italy continued to press, but their better knowledge of the fine points of the game was more than counterbalanced by the fearless play and great speed of the Finlanders. Just before halftime the score was altered to 2-2 by E. Soinio, who played most brilliantly the whole of the time.

 

The beginning of the second half was distinguished by quite a crowd of free kicks given against Finland; Niska, especially, offending very frequently by placing himself off-side. Finland was soon compelled to play a man short, Wickström being pretty badly hurt in a collision. The game was not without its exciting moments. Twice the Italian forwards had their opponents’ goal at their mercy, but Campelli, too, was also kept very busy, the Finnish forwards putting in some hard, straight shots towards the close of the second half. Comers were forced on both sides, but most of them were badly placed.

 

When time was called the game thus stood at 2 goals all, and an extra half hour had to be played. This gave the inherent tenacity of the Finnish-Swedish race an opportunity of showing what it could do, the Finns obtaining the lead after 10 minutes and retaining it to the end. Finland had its best men at centre half-back and outside left, while the strength of the Italian team lay in the outside left — Mariani — the left back and the goalkeeper. All the Italian team seemed to be tired after the long journey from the south of Europe. If the men had been thoroughly rested they would have had a far greater chance of beating the Finlanders.

 

FIRST ROUND

STADIUM: Råsunda Idrottsplats (Solna, Stockholm)

DATE: 29-06-1912 (15:00 h)

ATTENDANCE: 2.000

REFEREE: Herbert Willing (NED)

GOALS: 1-0 (Jäger 30’); 1-1 (Studnička 58’); 1-2 (Neubauer 62’); 1-3 (Merz 75’); 1-4 (Merz 81’); 1-5 (Cimera 89’)

INCIDENTS: According to the Olympic report, Wegele scored the German goal. Weber was injured early in the second half and left the game after the second Austrian goal, being replaced by Worpitzky as goalkeeper.

GER

Deutschland

Germany - Austria

Österreich

AUT

1-5 (1-0)

GERMANY

Weber

Röpnack, Hollstein

Krogmann, Breunig, Bosch

Wegele, Jäger (c), Worpitzky, Kipp, Hirsch

COACH: —

AUSTRIA

Noll

Kurpiel, Graubart

Brandstätter, Braunsteiner, Cimera

Hussak, Merz, Studnička (c), Müller, Neubauer

COACH: Jimmy Hogan

OLYMPIC REPORT

This match had drawn a pretty numerous public out to Råsunda and, as was to be expected, the spectators saw a hard, quick game. Little was seen of the finer points of football but still, the match was a very entertaining one. Germany won the toss and, during the first half, played with the wind at its back. At first it seemed as if Austria was going to be beaten by Germany, whose forwards were working magnificently. In front of goal, however, the attack was altogether too nervous to be able to trouble Noll very seriously. Graubart very finely cleared a hard head-punt at goal by Worpitzky. The Austrian right wing Hussak and Merz distinguished itself now and then by fine runs, but the forwards fell asleep with the ball when they came near the goal. After 30 minutes, Germany was given the lead by Wegele, who should have been given off-side. Immediately after, Noll was hard put to it to keep the ball out, and when half-time came, Germany still led by a goal.

 

During the pause, the Crown Prince Gustaf Adolf came out to shake hands with the men and then the game began again, but the character of the play was quite altered, the Austrian forwards beginning to get a good deal of life into their work. Their rushes came with lightning rapidity and with lots of power behind them, and during the course of one of these attacks the German goal-keeper was hurt pretty badly, though he managed to stay at his post. Ten minutes after play had re-started, however, he lost his first goal, the ball being put into the net by Studnička. The ice was now broken for the Austrians, and a brilliant piece of combination by their forwards allowed Müller to give Austria the lead with a very hot shot. A brief pause had to be made in order to attend to the German goal-keeper, who was obliged to leave the ground. Worpitzky took his place, but the match was hopelessly lost for Germany and, with very brief intervals, Merz put 2 balls past the temporary goal-keeper. Germany’s defeat was made complete when, just before the whistle was blown, Cimera found the net with a well-directed side-shot. Austria thus won a well-deserved victory by 5 goals to 1. Their forwards were much superior in combination to those of their opponents, and were better served by their half-backs. The result would probably not have been much changed even if Germany had played the whole of the second half with a full team.

 

FIRST ROUND

STADIUM: Olympiastadion (Stockholm)

DATE: 29-06-1912 (19:00 h)

ATTENDANCE: 14.000

REFEREE: George Wagstaffe-Simmons (GBR)

GOALS: 1-0 (Svensson 3’); 1-1 (Bouvy 28’); 1-2 (Vos 43’); 1-3 (Bouvy 52’); 2-3 (E. Börjesson [p.] 62’); 3-3 (Svensson 80’); 3-4 (Vos 91’)

INCIDENTS: Erik Börjesson missed a penalty shot (min. 86), saved by Göbel.

SWE

Sverige

Sweden - Netherlands

Nederland

NED

3-4 (1-2;3-3)

SWEDEN

J. Börjesson

Bergström, Levin

Wicksell, Sandberg, Gustafsson

Myhrberg (c), Svensson, E. Börjesson, Ekroth, Ansén

COACH: Charles Bunyan

NETHERLANDS

Göbel

Wijnveldt, Feith

De Wolf, De Korver, Lotsij (c)

Van Breda Kolff, De Groot, Ten Cate, Vos, Bouvy

COACH: Edgar Chadwick

OLYMPIC REPORT

About 14,000 persons had passed the turnstiles at the Stadium when the two teams turned out for this match. Never before had there been any football match in Sweden when such excitement prevailed and, in spite of the — from the Swedish point of view — unfortunate result, there were many that drew a breath of relief when the whistle blew at the end of a 2 hours’ game, and everybody’s nerves could once more settle down into their ordinary condition.

 

The first few minutes were entirely Holland’s. The short rapid passing of their opponent’s forwards quite took the Swedish half-backs by surprise and it was only bad luck and the Swedish backs that prevented Holland from obtaining a well-deserved lead. But before long, Sweden recovered from its first surprise and then it became Göbel’s turn to work at high pressure. A perfect hurricane of applause broke forth when Svensson, the best forward on the ground, gave Sweden the lead with a ball that grazed one of the Dutch backs before it flew into the net. A very hard shot by the same man a couple of minutes later found Göbel quite unprepared for its reception, but the ball struck the cross-bar. Holland’s forwards and half-backs now began to show a little better form, and it was clearly only a question of time ere the levelling goal would be made. J. Börjesson had to give away a corner in order to save a lightning shot off the little Ten Cates’s foot, and from the scrummage in front of the goal the ball found its way into the net. Ten Cate also had a “foot” in Holland’s second goal, which was made just before half time, a nice piece of work between him and Vos resulting in the Dutch getting the lead from a shot by the latter player.

 

The second half was opened by Holland at high pressure, and the Swedish defence was soon hard put to it. J. Börjesson cleared a low shot from De Groot excellently, but, while he was still on the ground, Bouvy put the ball neatly past him into the net. With a lead of 2 goals Holland slackened speed a bit and this almost cost them the victory. A foul made against Svensson gave Sweden a penalty kick which was used to fullest advantage by E. Börjesson. During the last fifteen minutes of the second half the Swedish forwards played magnificently. Svensson brought the score level with a shot that gave Göbel no chance at all. Then E. Börjesson dribbled the ball almost into the net, when he was tripped. He took the penalty kick himself, only to see that most phenomenal goal-keeper, Göbel, clear in some marvellons way, and then Sweden’s last chance went when, a minute later, Ansén, 2 metres from the goal, sent the ball on the wrong side of the post.

 

There is not much to be said about the extra half hour. Gustafsson made a present of a corner to Holland, which gave the Dutch the winning goal. During the remainder of the time the Dutch played with 4 half-backs, and in the last line of defence Göbel was always where he ought to be. Although Sweden ought to have won the match if it had had a little luck and had taken advantage of all its opportunities, there is no doubt but that the better team — speaking of it as a whole — won. It was the better combination of the Dutch and the unselfish play of their men that gained them the match. Individually, Sweden had quite as good a side as Holland — with a couple of pretty bad exceptions. Svensson, E. Börjesson, Levin and Bergström were the best of the Swedes, while Göbel, De Korver, Bouvy and Van Breda Kolff did most work for Holland.

 

SECOND ROUND

STADIUM: Sportplats Traneberg (Traneberg, Stockholm)

DATE: 30-06-1912 (10:00 h)

ATTENDANCE: 200

REFEREE: Per Sjöblom (SWE)

GOALS: 0-1 (Wiberg 30’); 1-1 (Butusov 72’); 1-2 (Öhman 80’)

RUS

Россия

Russia - Finland

Suomi

FIN

1-2 (0-1)

RUSSIA

Favorskij

Sokolov, Markov

Akimov, Khromov, Kynin

M. Smirnov, A. Filippov (c), Butusov, Zhitarev, S. Filippov

COACHES: Robert Fulda / Georgy Duperron

FINLAND

Syrjäläinen

Holopainen, Löfgren

Lund, E. Soinio (c), Lietola

Wickström, Wiberg, Nyyssönen, Öhman, Niska

COACH: —

OLYMPIC REPORT

The early hour at which this match was played, and the interesting events which were to come off later on in the day, had the result that there were only a couple of hundred spectators present when the referee blew the whistle for the start. It could be seen from the first that the two teams knew each other’s “points” very well and, although they were the least bit stiff after the fatiguing match against Italy, the Finns played all the time as if they knew that they would win. The result turned out as had been expected, although by a narrower majority than was generally looked for. No complaint could be made as to the pace of the play, which was very fast the whole of the time — the remarkable pace of the Russian players contributing not least to this — but there is not so much to say as regards the science and combination shown. A couple of first-class Swedish clubs could have shown better form.

 

From the very beginning Finland had the upper hand, and their forwards attacked again and again, but they shot very badly, so that half an hour passed before anything sensational occurred. At last, however, Finland’s inside right sent in a beautiful ball which Favorskij could not quite clear, and Wiberg, who followed up, had no difficulty in getting the ball again and placing Finland ahead. After this success Finland played better, and managed to force several corners, but half time came without any additional goal.

 

When the second 45 minutes began, Russia seemed as if it meant to surprise its opponents. S. Filippov, the outside left, a speedy and intelligent player, being specially prominent, and, if he had had better inside forwards, his well-placed centering must have led to quite a number of goals. As it was, Russia got only one, made in the scrummage after a corner. The Finns now began to perceive their danger, and commenced to play a harder and more energetic game, and the Russians tiring towards the close of the match as a result of the severe pressure, it could be seen that Finland would be the victor. Just before time was called, Öhman made the winning goal after having dribbled through the Russian defence.

 

The players on both sides had still much to learn in the technics of the game. As was said above, the Russian forwards were very speedy, but they could do nothing in consequence of faulty combination. S. Filippov, the outside left, and Sokolov, the right back, were Russia’s best men, while the strength of the Finland team lay in the stubborn defence offered by their backs.

 

SECOND ROUND

STADIUM: Olympiastadion (Stockholm)

DATE: 30-06-1912 (13:30 h)

ATTENDANCE: 8.000

REFEREE: Christiaan Groothoff (NED)

GOALS: 1-0 (Walden 21’); 2-0 (Walden 23’); 3-0 (Walden 42’); 4-0 (Walden 49’); 5-0 (Woodward 53’); 6-0 (Walden 55’); 7-0 (Walden 85’)

INCIDENTS: FIFA credits the third British goal to Woodward and the fifth to Walden. Bodnár missed a penalty shot (min. 15), saved by Brebner. With the score 2-0, Hanney left the pitch because of an injury. In the second half, Hoare missed a penalty shot, saved by Domonkos.

GBR

Great Britain

Great Britain - Hungary

Magyarország

HUN

7-0 (3-0)

GREAT BRITAIN

Brebner

Burn, Knight

Littlewort, Hanney, Dines

Berry, Woodward (c), Walden, Hoare, Sharpe

COACH: Adrian Birch

HUNGARY

Domonkos

Rumbold, Payer

Bíró, Károly (c), Vágó

Sebestyén, Bodnár, Pataki, Schlosser, Borbás

COACH: Ede Herczog

OLYMPIC REPORT

In spite of the tremendous heat that prevailed, this match was witnessed by about 7,000 persons, quite a crowd for a football match in Stockholm. The heat seemed to suit the lively, powerfully built Hungarians and, at first, things looked a little dark for Great Britain, whose defence was really the only part of the team that had anything to do for the first quarter of an hour — though, at the same time, it seemed quite equal to any demands that might be made on it. If the Hungarian forwards had been a little cooler in front of goal, and had calculated their chances better, however, the result might easily have been altogether different to what it was. In any case, the ball went whizzing in every direction round Brebner’s goal — in every direction but the right one, and after some fifteen minutes, Hungary was awarded a penalty kick for “hands”. Bodnár made an excellent effort, but Brebner cleared grandly. After this it was Great Britain’s turn to attack, Walden giving his team the lead by an irresistible shot, made at a distance of 20 metres from the goal-mouth. Only a couple of minutes elapsed ere the same player came forward again, after a “hands” that Mr. Groothoff, the referee, could not possibly see, and the Hungarians, who unwisely enough did not play on while waiting for the whistle, but stopped to appeal to the referee, let Walden put the ball into the net without hindrance. Then succeeded a few uneasy minutes for Great Britain. Hanney, Hoare and Walden were all injured; the first so seriously that he was compelled to abstain from all further participation in the game, while the two others, fortunately for their side, were able to resume their places after a minute or two, Hoare retired from the front line to act as half-back, but, in spite of the numerically weakened attack, Woodward and Co. managed to give the Hungarian defence a very warm time, and, three minutes before the first forty-five was ended, Walden made a beautiful goal after a corner.

 

The second half was entirely Great Britain’s, although they were playing only ten men, Sharpe having to do double work on the left wing. Scarcely four minutes had elapsed from the re-start, ere Walden got his forehead to a centre by Sharpe and made a very pretty goal. The fifth in the series was obtained by Vivian Woodward, after threading through the Hungarian defence, while the sixth and seventh goals came from Walden’s foot. The game was now a hopeless one as far as Hungary was concerned, but the Magyar team worked on indefatigably and kept the British defence fully employed, especially during the last few minutes, when the forwards of Great Britain’s team, relying on the 7 goals’ lead, took things pretty quietly.

 

Of course, the best team won, but there was by no means 7 goals’ difference between the two elevens. If the Hungarians had but had the least bit of their opponents’ finishing power, their forwards must have made several goals. Great Britain won the game by its confident play in front of goal, its fine combination, and the individual skill of its members. Nothing but praise can be given to the team, both as a whole and individually. Domonkos, Rumbold, Károly and Schlosser, of the Hungarians, deserve more than a word of praise.

 

SECOND ROUND

STADIUM: Råsunda Idrottsplats (Solna, Stockholm)

DATE: 30-06-1912 (16:30 h)

ATTENDANCE: 700

REFEREE: Ruben Gelbord (SWE)

GOALS: 1-0 (Olsen 4’); 2-0 (Wolfhagen 25’); 3-0 (Middelboe 37’); 4-0 (S. Nielsen 60’); 5-0 (Olsen 70’); 6-0 (S. Nielsen 85’); 7-0 (Olsen 88’)

INCIDENTS: According to the Olympic report, the scoring sequence is as follows: 1-0 (Olsen 4’); 2-0 (Middelboe 25’); 3-0 (Wolfhagen 27’); 4-0 (Christoffersen 60’); 5-0 (Olsen 70’); 6-0 (S. Nielsen 85’); 7-0 (Olsen 88’).

DEN

Danmark

Denmark - Norway

Norge

NOR

7-0 (3-0)

DENMARK

S. Hansen

Von Buchwald, H. Hansen

Lykke, Middelboe (c), Berth

Petersen, S. Nielsen, Olsen, Christoffersen, Wolfhagen

COACH: Louis Østrup

NORWAY

I. Pedersen

Skou, Baastad

Johansen, Herlofson (c), Andersen

Reinholdt, Krefting, Endrerud, R. Maartmann, E. Maartmann

COACH: Vince Hayes

OLYMPIC REPORT

Denmark, certain of winning, did not place its best team in the field, but played reserves instead of Poul Nielsen, Oskar Nørland [Nielsen] and Castella. The superiority of the Danes was evident from the very first moment, and the whole resolved itself more into an exhibition game than a match. Only 3 minutes had passed when Anthon Olsen, the best shot at goal in all the Olympic football matches, found the way into the Norwegian net after a nice piece of work in combination with Sophus Nielsen. The Norwegians held their own very well for the first quarter of an hour, and the two Maartmanns gave Von Buchwald a few lively moments. They seldom came past the 18-yards line, however, Von Buchwald and Harald Hansen at back being in tip-top form. It would occupy too much space to attempt to describe the innumerable attacks on I. Pedersen’s goal made by the smart Danish quintette. Middelboe, undoubtedly one of the foremost football-players in the world, obtained the second goal for Denmark by a hot shot that went just below the cross-bar, and the third was made very prettily by Wolfhagen a couple of minutes later.

 

The second forty-five did not differ essentially from the first half, unless by a falling-off in the keenness of the play. The result was a foregone conclusion, as both sides seemed to know. Christoffersen and Olsen each made a couple of goals more, but the attention of the lookers-on was, for the most part, directed to the very scientific displays given every now and then by Middelboe, Sophus Nielsen and Berth. Both Middelboe and Berth came very near to making a couple of extra points, after having corkscrewed the ball through the perfectly demoralized Norwegian defence, but in both instances I. Pedersen saved very resolutely. When the referee blew his whistle at the close of the 90 minutes, however, Denmark had won as it liked by 7 goals to none. The Danish team is not to be blamed for not having done all it could. In spite of the presence of two or three reserve men in the eleven there was not a weak spot anywhere, and the game was finely generalled by the omni present Middelboe. Norway fell with honour, for its opponent was immensely superior, but it was weakly represented in places. The best of the Norwegians were the brothers Maartmann, Herlofson and Baastad.

 

SECOND ROUND

STADIUM: Råsunda Idrottsplats (Solna, Stockholm)

DATE: 30-06-1912 (19:00 h)

ATTENDANCE: 7.000

REFEREE: David Philips (GBR)

GOALS: 1-0 (Bouvy 8’); 2-0 (Ten Cate 12’); 3-0 (Vos 34’); 3-1 (Müller 41’)

INCIDENTS: FIFA tallies the third Dutch goal in minute 30.

NED

Nederland

Netherlands - Austria

Österreich

AUT

3-1 (3-1)

NETHERLANDS

Göbel

Wijnveldt, Bouman

Lotsij (c), Boutmy, Fortgens

Van Breda Kolff, De Groot, Ten Cate, Vos, Bouvy

COACH: Edgar Chadwick

AUSTRIA

Noll

Kurpiel, Graubart

Brandstätter, Braunsteiner, Cimera

Hussak, Merz, Studnička (c), Neubauer, Müller

COACH: Jimmy Hogan

OLYMPIC REPORT

Austria played the same team that had beaten Germany, while Holland was obliged to bring in a couple of reserves, these, however, by no means weakening the team, but rather the reverse. A hard, interesting game had been hoped for, and everything turned out according to expectations, the match proving one of the best played up to this point in the competition.

 

The Austrian forwards took charge of the ball for the first ten minutes, and ought to have made a goal before the Dutchmen warmed to their work and taken the measure of their opponents, but, when once they had done so, the roles were quite altered. The front five of the Hollanders soon found out how to trick the Austrian defence, which everywhere went in for hard, rushing tactics. The ball was sent from one to the other of the five Dutch forwards with wonderful precision, and, after a brief period of this brilliant play the team had gained a lead a winning one — as it turned out, of three goals. Bouvy, Holland’s reliable and speedy outside left, had the merit of finding the net first, but off-side should have been given against him. Ere Austria had well recovered from the shock, the ball lay once more behind Noll for, directly the ball was started again, Vos got hold of it, dribbled it down to the goal-mouth and, as Noll could only partly divert the shot, Ten Cate, following up, had no difficulty in putting the ball in from close quarters. Austria now began to play with all the energy of despair, but Göbel was in the same brilliant form that he had shown against Sweden, and he gathered in with the greatest confidence all the balls directed against the Dutch goal. Then Holland’s forwards got possession of the ball again, and, 34 minutes after the beginning of the game, Vos put a lightning shot between Noll’s legs, making the game 3-0 in favour of Holland. During the last few minutes of the first half, however, the Dutch defence was tried to its uttermost, and at last Alois Müller succeeded in putting in a ball that even Göbel had no possibility of clearing.

 

A few sentences will be enough to describe the last half of the game. Holland drew in its team around the home goal and played entirely on the defensive, and it became plain that the hard match against Sweden had made the men a little stiff and tired. In spite of continual pressure, however, the Austrian attack could not get past Göbel who, during this portion of the game, simply surpassed himself. Towards the close play became a bit rough, while several decisions of the referee’s did not seem to be very palatable to the supporters of the Austrians. The best men amongst Holland’s team were Göbel (in goal), the backs and the left wing of the forwards, while Braunsteiner, Studnička and Müller played a good game for Austria.

 

1/2 FINAL

STADIUM: Olympiastadion (Stockholm)

DATE: 2-07-1912 (15:00 h)

ATTENDANCE: 4.000

REFEREE: Ruben Gelbord (SWE)

GOALS: 1-0 (Sharpe 2’); 2-0 (Walden 7’); 3-0 (Walden 75’); 4-0 (Woodward 82’)

INCIDENTS: Knight missed a penalty shot (min. 15).

GBR

Great Britain

Great Britain - Finland

Suomi

FIN

4-0 (2-0)

GREAT BRITAIN

Brebner

Burn, Knight

Littlewort, Stamper, Dines

Sharpe, Woodward (c), Walden, Hoare, Wright

COACH: Adrian Birch

FINLAND

Syrjäläinen

Holopainen, Löfgren

Lund, E. Soinio (c), Lietola

Wickström, Wiberg, Nyyssönen, Öhman, Niska

COACH: —

OLYMPIC REPORT

Finland, although a freak of Fortune had allowed it to reach the semi-final, had not, of course, the least chance of beating Great Britain, but the team in its game with its redoubtable opponent, played a far better game than in any of its other matches on Swedish soil. The forwards worked really well together; the half-backs gave very effective support to the attack, and the backs were of the “do or die” type. Great Britain, which was giving a rest to a couple of its best men, played merely to win the match, and not to break any record by piling up goals. They very carefully avoided all collisions with the powerfully-built, tough Finlanders, but played a fine passing game, with plenty of science, so as to win with the least possible expenditure of energy. The game, in consequence, did not present any features of very absorbing interest and a very few words will suffice to describe it in full.

 

Sharpe, who, on this occasion, took Arthur Berry’s place as Vivian Woodward’s companion on the right wing, made a beginning immediately after the start by centering with a slow, falling ball towards the goal, which Holopainen, in his anxiety to clear, managed to put into the net. Everyone believed that goal would succeed goal in lighting succession when, scarcely 5 minutes later, Sharpe centered another ball which was converted by Walden, who was a bit livelier than the rest of the British forwards. Constantly on the defensive, the Finnish rear men began to be a little careless as to the methods they employed, but when at the end of a quarter of an hour a penalty kick was awarded to Great Britain, the leaders seem to consider that this was altogether too severe a punishment, and the ball was ostentatively put over the cross-bar. During the remainder of the first half the impression grew stronger and stronger that the British team was playing with its opponent as a cat plays with a mouse; beautiful and well combined attacks finishing with careless shots in every direction but the right one.

 

The second forty-five minutes was of the same character as the first, although, during the first portion of the time, the Finlanders enjoyed a very good deal of the play. Nyyssönen lead a number of good attacks, but Brebner, who once or twice put his hand to the ball, never really had to do much behind men like Burn and Knight. Then some more samples were given of delightful combinations between Great Britain’s forward quintette and its half-backs, but no power was put into the shooting, although Syrjäläinen must be paid the compliment of the statement that he was in excellent form in goal. No less than 32 minutes elapsed ere Walden got a third goal for Great Britain from the scrummage a few metres in front of the Finnish net. Five minutes later when the cry of the spectators “We want more g-o-a-l-s” grew too strong, Vivian Woodward headed a fine goal as Great Britain’s fourth and last.

 

1/2 FINAL

STADIUM: Olympiastadion (Stockholm)

DATE: 2-07-1912 (19:00 h)

ATTENDANCE: 6.000

REFEREE: Ede Herczog (HUN)

GOALS: 0-1 (Jørgensen 7’); 0-2 (Olsen 25’); 0-3 (P. Nielsen 37’); 1-3 (H. Hansen [o.g.] 85’); 1-4 (Olsen 87’)

INCIDENTS: FIFA tallies the second and fourth Danish goals in minutes 14 and 65 (respectively). Poul Nielsen had to leave the pitch in minute 60 due to injury.

NED

Nederland

Netherlands - Denmark

Danmark

DEN

1-4 (0-3)

NETHERLANDS

Göbel

Wijnveldt, Bouman

Fortgens, Boutmy, Lotsij (c)

Van Breda Kolff, De Groot, Ten Cate, Vos, Bouvy

COACH: Edgar Chadwick

DENMARK

S. Hansen

Middelboe (c), H. Hansen

Von Buchwald, Jørgensen, Berth

Nørland, P. Nielsen, Olsen, S. Nielsen, Wolfhagen

COACH: Louis Østrup

OLYMPIC REPORT

If the semi-final Great Britain v. Finland had been almost featureless, this match was a beautiful and most interesting one. It may be said, without any exaggeration, that it was the finest game ever played in this country, and it was the play of the Danish team that made it so. It will be easy to imagine Denmark’s superiority when we say that, during the whole of the match, the Danish goal was not even once seriously threatened. The single goal that Holland obtained was simply and solely the result of a misunderstanding between Sophus and Harald Hansen, while Göbel, the brilliant Dutch goal-keeper, was the man that prevented Denmark from more emphatically accentuating its superiority.

 

Denmark played the game at high pressure from the very first moment. The ball flew from man to man with an almost unnatural precision, and, finely lead by Anthon Olsen, the Danish forwards commenced to let the ball whizz in towards the Dutch goal, where Göbel won round after round of thundering applause when he cleared apparently impossible shots. His backs being close in upon him they hid from view, however, a long, high ball which was sent in by Jørgensen from the 18 yards line — and Denmark got the lead. The Dutch team strained every nerve and sinew, but all their attacks broke against the stubborn Danish defence which, at the same time, fed its own forwards most brilliantly. After 25 minutes Olsen received the ball from Poul Nielsen, succeeded in avoiding all Boutmy’s well-meant attentions and in an instant had found his way through the crowd of defenders. Göbel made a vain attempt to clear the hard and well-directed shot that followed, but the ball flew right into the corner of the net. The Danes now had their blood up and, during the remainder of the half, they played ideal football. Nils Middelboe dribbled from his position as back, right through the Dutch team, but the ball struck the cross-bar; shots from Jørgensen, Poul and Sophus Nielsen either struck the posts, or were cleared in a masterly fashion by Göbel, but admirably as the latter played he could not prevent Poul Nielsen, after a comer, from getting a third goal for Denmark.

 

During the second forty-five minutes, Denmark relaxed the pressure somewhat, and began to rely on its defence and a three goals’ lead. Bouvy and Ten Cate changed places, but Jørgensen shadowed the speedy Bouvy quite as effectively as Von Buchwald and Middelboe had done at an earlier period of the game. In a collision with Bouman, Poul Nielsen sprained his knee and had to be carried off the field, but the accident made no noticeable difference in the play of the Danes, Oskar Nørland [Nielsen] surpassing himself now that he was left alone on the right wing. But then Holland managed to get a goal. Van Breda Kolff succeeded in getting a loose ball towards the Danish home-quarters; Sophus Hansen rushed forward to take the ball but, at the same instant, Harald Hansen quite unexpectedly hindered him, and put the ball into their own goal into the bargain. Denmark knew the right kind of cure for this accident. As soon as the ball was kicked off it went to Wolfhagen, who tricked it past Fortgens and Wijnveldt and then sent it with a hard pass at the height of the hips across to Olsen who, from a distance of 20 metres, made the loveliest goal of the Olympic football competition. The ball went with the speed of a cannon-ball and, wisely enough, Göbel made no attempt to clear it. Thunders of applause were still echoing round the Stadium when the game was once more started, but then came “Time” with Denmark a well-deserving winner by 4 goals to 1. The Danes played an ideal game and no weak spot could be found in the team. The soul of the eleven was Nils Middelboe, but all the men deserved praise. Holland played as well as Denmark allowed them to do. Göbel, in goal, was head and shoulders above the other players of the team, and it was entirely due to him that the defeat of the Dutch was kept within reasonable limits.

 

PLACES 3-4

STADIUM: Råsunda Idrottsplats (Solna, Stockholm)

DATE: 4-07-1912 (15:00 h)

ATTENDANCE: 1.000

REFEREE: Per Sjöblom (SWE)

GOALS: 1-0 (Van der Sluis 24’); 2-0 (De Groot 28’); 3-0 (Vos 29’); 4-0 (Vos 43’); 5-0 (Vos 46’); 6-0 (Van der Sluis 57’); 7-0 (Vos 74’); 8-0 (Vos 78’); 9-0 (De Groot 86’)

NED

Nederland

Netherlands - Finland

Suomi

FIN

9-0 (4-0)

NETHERLANDS

Göbel

Wijnveldt, Feith

De Wolf, Lotsij (c), Boutmy

Van Breda Kolff, De Groot, Van der Sluis, Vos, Bouvy

COACH: Edgar Chadwick

FINLAND

Syrjäläinen

Holopainen, Löfgren

Lund, E. Soinio (c), Lietola

Tanner, Wiberg, Öhman, Nyyssönen, Niska

COACH: —

OLYMPIC REPORT

There was a very small attendance, for the public had evidently made up its mind beforehand as to the probable result of this match, everybody expecting Holland to win, a presumption that was fulfilled to the least tittle, the Dutch team winning with greater ease even than had perhaps been expected. The Finlanders pressed at the beginning, still, without giving Göbel very much to do. The great heat prevailing soon caused the pace to slacken somewhat, and this gave Holland a chance to play the game it liked, but 30 minutes passed before the first goal came, made after a corner, and, when once the ice was broken, matters went far better for Holland. The Dutch left wing gave the ball to De Groot as he was excellently placed for the shot, and he fully responded to the confidence placed in him. The Finlanders worked in the sweat of their brows but, after a very short interval, the ball once more found its way into their net, put there by Vos, and immediately before half-time was called, it paid another visit, after a corner.

 

The Dutch had thus a start of 4 goals and could have felt quite assured of the third prize, but they monopolized the play during the second half too. Van der Sluis, the new centre, was very attentive to the ball and managed to make two goals, in much about the same manner each time. Syrjäläinen muffed the ball on each occasion, and the Dutchman was altogether too quick for him. Finland’s defence was hard put to it the whole of the time and, towards the close, the only question was as the number of goals the Dutch forwards would be able to make. Vos (2) an De Groot succeeded in bringing the total up to 9, and it was only the referee’s whistle, proclaiming the finish of the game, that saved Syrjäläinen’s goal from further visits. Finland played a great deal worse than it had done against Great Britain, and no one in the Dutch team had to exert himself very much in order to gain a well-deserved third prize for his country.

 

FINAL

STADIUM: Olympiastadion (Stockholm)

DATE: 4-07-1912 (19:00 h)

ATTENDANCE: 25.000

REFEREE: Christiaan Groothoff (NED)

GOALS: 0-1 (Walden 10’); 0-2 (Walden 22’); 1-2 (Olsen 27’); 1-3 (Hoare 41’); 1-4 (Berry 43’); 2-4 (Olsen 81’)

INCIDENTS: FIFA credits the second British goal to Hoare. Von Buchwald had to leave the pitch in minute 30 due to injury.

DEN

Danmark

Denmark - Great Britain

Great Britain

GBR

2-4 (1-4)

DENMARK

S. Hansen

Middelboe (c), H. Hansen

Von Buchwald, Jørgensen, Berth

Nørland, Thufason, Olsen, S. Nielsen, Wolfhagen

COACH: Louis Østrup

GREAT BRITAIN

Brebner

Burn, Knight

McWhirter, Littlewort, Dines

Berry, Woodward (c), Walden, Hoare, Sharpe

COACH: Adrian Birch

OLYMPIC REPORT

The football final in the competition proper had been awaited with the greatest interest, and close on 25,000 persons had passed the many turnstiles of the Stadium when the teams of Great Britain and Denmark met for the final struggle. Great Britain was able to place its best eleven on the ground, but the chances of its opponent were lessened by the Danes being obliged to play reserves instead of the well-known Danish back, Castella, and Poul Nielsen, Thufason not being anything like equal to Poul Nielsen in the front line of attack. Against Holland the Danish forwards had played like one man, no one making a single fault, but now the combination often went to pieces in Thufason’s section.

 

Denmark kicked off, but Great Britain was the first to make an attack by means of Berry. It was evident that the teams were taking each other’s measure and, for the first ten minutes, the ball oscillated somewhat nervously between S. Hansen’s and Brebner’s goals. When ten minutes had passed, however, the British line of forwards steadied itself, and a well-executed centre attack was completed by Walden’s making the first goal of the match. Great Britain continued to press, but Middelboe and the rest of the Danish defence left nothing to chance, attacking with vigour and assurance while, at the same time, it gave good support to its own forwards. Anthon Olsen gave Brebner a whizzing shot which the British goal-keeper was obliged to tip over the bar, but, from the corner that followed, Jørgensen only put the ball hard against the timber. Great Britain’s second goal was a remarkable present from Harald Hansen, who stopped the ball a long way out on the line and directly afterwards, without the least reason in the world, sent it in towards his own goal. Quite naturally, two of the English forwards were unmarked, and Walden put the ball past Sophus Hansen, who was absolutely helpless. But Denmark did not lose courage. The half-backs began to play a harder game and, from a pass by Von Buchwald, Anthon Olsen drove a lightning ball past Brebner from a distance of about 25 metres. This goal poured oil on the Danish fire, and each moment it looked as if the teams would be brought level when, suddenly, Von Buchwald, after having headed a ball, fell and sprained his hand badly. He had to be helped from the field, and Sophus Nielsen, the brilliant strategist of the Danish five, was obliged to retire to half-back. As a natural consequence the Danish combination went to pieces in places, and the British team knew very well how to make use of their opportunities. Before three minutes more had elapsed they had made the figures 4-1, the result of most brilliant play on the part of the forwards. Hoare made the first of these two fresh goals, a hard and accurate header from Berry’s centering, and Berry himself secured the fourth after dribbling past Harald Hansen.

 

Half-time came with this result unaltered. During the second half the Danes continued to play with ten men, and altered the arrangement of their team, Jørgensen and Nils Middelboe changing places. The first part of the second forty-five minutes resolved itself into a long duel between Great Britain’s forwards and the Danish defence, the latter being quite equal, however, to dealing with their formidable opponents. On the other hand, the four Danish forwards could make no very great impression on the British defence, the latter, too, playing an exceedingly hard game, But then Middelboe changed places once more, this time with Anthon Olsen, and the ball began to whiz about Brebner’s goal again. Anthon Olsen played excellently at centre halfback — the Danes seemed to be able to play equally well in any position — and from his foot came the only goal made during the second half, once more a long low ball a couple of inches above the ground. This goal made the British team uneasy. Woodward awakened his comrades’ spirits, which had shown the least signs in the world of drooping, and then Denmark could consider itself fortunate that it had a man of Sophus Hansen’s high class in front of goal. Many were the shots he saved, but still more numerous were those that whizzed beside and behind the posts. Gordon Hoare, especially, had exceedingly bad luck with a magnificent shot that flew about 18 inches above the ground and struck the outer corner of the side-post when S. Hansen was at the other side of the goal.

 

Great Britain won a well deserved victory, and would probably have come out on top, even if Denmark had been able to play 11 men to the close. The result might have been doubtful, however. Every man in the British team did his duty, and did it to the utmost of his power. The backs allowed no one to come to close quarters. Denmark had two weak men in Harald Hansen and Thufason, but it fell with honour and after having been treated by Fortune with more than on average share of ill-will. Its semi-final against Holland was a far pleasanter match to look at, as, in the final, nervousness was too much in evidence in the Danish team.

 

CONSOLATION SERIES — FIRST ROUND

STADIUM: Sportplats Traneberg (Traneberg, Stockholm)

DATE: 1-07-1912 (11:00 h)

ATTENDANCE: 200

REFEREE: Per Sjöblom (SWE)

GOALS: 1-0 (Grundwald 10’)

INCIDENTS: FIFA credits Neubauer with the Austrian goal in minute 2. In the second half, Austria and Norway lost one man each due to injury.

AUT

Österreich

Austria - Norway

Norge

NOR

1-0 (1-0)

AUSTRIA

Kaltenbrunner

Kurpiel, Braunsteiner

Weber (c), Brandstätter, Cimera

Müller, Blaha, Merz, Grundwald, Neubauer

COACH: Jimmy Hogan

NORWAY

I. Pedersen

Skou, Baastad

Johansen, Herlofson (c), Jensen

Reinholdt, Krefting, Endrerud, R. Maartmann, E. Maartmann

COACH: Vince Hayes

OLYMPIC REPORT

As had been expected, Austria had to bring up its reserves for this match to fill places in goal, the left and right inner forwards, and the centre half-back positions, while Norway had changed only one man, the left half-back. Under ordinary circumstances, Norway would have been an easy prey for Austria, but, as it was, the difference was the least possible, 1 goal.

 

The attack varied rapidly during the first quarter of an hour but then came the goal which was to be the only one made during the match and, therefore, the deciding one, the Austrian inner left finding the corner of the net with a chance ball. Norway had quite as much of the game in the open as the Austrians, but the work of the latter in front of goal made their attack considerably more dangerous. They had no lack of opportunities to increase their lead, but every chance was thrown away, or else I. Pedersen managed to save the Norwegian goal. The first 20 minutes of the last half were entirely Austria’s, but after one of the Austrian forwards had been carried off the field injured, things took a fresh turn, and if the Norwegians had kicked straighter they would certainly have equalized. They, too, soon lost one of their attacking force, Reinholt, who hurt his foot. The game now went a bit lamely, and time was called with the figures unaltered. Austria showed superior skill, and deserved to win by a greater majority. In this match, however, Norway played better than it had done against Denmark.

 

CONSOLATION SERIES — FIRST ROUND

STADIUM: Råsunda Idrottsplats (Solna, Stockholm)

DATE: 1-07-1912 (17:00 h)

ATTENDANCE: 2.000

REFEREE: Christiaan Groothoff (NED)

GOALS: 1-0 (Fuchs 2’); 2-0 (Förderer 6’); 3-0 (Fuchs 9’); 4-0 (Fuchs 21’); 5-0 (Förderer 27’); 6-0 (Fuchs 28’); 7-0 (Burger 30’); 8-0 (Fuchs 34’); 9-0 (Fuchs 46’); 10-0 (Fuchs 51’); 11-0 (Förderer 53’); 12-0 (Fuchs 55’); 13-0 (Oberle 58’); 14-0 (Fuchs 65’); 15-0 (Förderer 66’); 16-0 (Fuchs 69’)

GER

Deutschland

Germany - Russia

Россия

RUS

16-0 (8-0)

GERMANY

Werner

Reese, Hempel

Burger, Glaser, Ugi (c)

Uhle, Förderer, Fuchs, Oberle, Thiel

COACH: —

RUSSIA

Favorskij

Sokolov, Rimsha

Uverskij, Khromov, Yakovlev

M. Smirnov, Nikitin, Butusov (c), Zhitarev, S. Filippov

COACHES: Robert Fulda / Georgy Duperron

OLYMPIC REPORT

For this match, Germany put into the field an almost entirely new team which was, perhaps, the least bit better than the one that had lost to Austria. Consideration must, of course, be paid to the fact that Russia was not able to offer any serious resistance, as the speady, ready-witted German forwards pierced the Russian defence as easily as a sail-maker’s needle does the canvas.

 

A description of the match would become a somewhat tedious enumeration of the goals made by Germany, which numbered no less than 8 during each period. The Russian defence was continually strengthened by the forwards, who seldom or never received the ball from their half-backs, and who therefore had to do what they could themselves to prepare the way for an attack. Fuchs, Förderer and Oberle made the goals for their team, turn and turn about. Had they been opposed by a first class goal-keeper, however, the number of goals made against the Russians would have been reduced, as many balls which found the net were shot from at distance of 20 or 25 metres.

 

CONSOLATION SERIES — FIRST ROUND

STADIUM: Råsunda Idrottsplats (Solna, Stockholm)

DATE: 1-07-1912 (19:00 h)

ATTENDANCE: 2.500

REFEREE: Herbert Willing (NED)

GOALS: 0-1 (Bontadini 15’)

INCIDENTS: FIFA credits Bontadini with the Italian goal in minute 30. Wicksell was injured in the first half and had to leave the game.

SWE

Sverige

Sweden - Italy

Italia

ITA

0-1 (0-1)

SWEDEN

J. Börjesson

Bergström, Törnqvist

Wicksell, Frykman, Gustafsson

Myhrberg (c), Svensson, E. Börjesson, Dahlström, Ansén

COACH: Charles Bunyan

ITALY

Campelli

De Vecchi, Valle

Binaschi, G. Milano (c), Leone

Bontadini, Berardo, Sardi, Barbesino, Mariani

COACH: Vittorio Pozzo

OLYMPIC REPORT

Italy relied on the same team that had been so narrowly beaten by Finland, while Sweden had new men on the inside left, at centre half-back and at left back, viz. Dahlström (from Eskilstuna), Frykman and Törnqvist. Everyone had prophesied an easy victory for Sweden, and the team evidently suffered from the fault of making light of its opponents. The Swedes began the game as if it was merely a question of playing with the other team, but they soon had their eyes opened in a very unpleasant way. Italy knew that it was matched against a team which, on paper, was miles superior to its own and so it played for all it was worth, and the Swedish defence almost at once found itself in difficulties. Not more than a couple of minutes had elapsed ere a ball from the Italian centre found its way into the Swedish net, but Mr. Willing, the referee, disallowed the goal on account of “hands”. The Swedish forwards played very limply, and could not keep the ball going, while, after about a quarter of an hour’s play, the Italian outside right passed very nicely to the centre, who transferred the ball without any difficulty to the net, this time in a perfectly legitimate manner. For a short time the Swedes played up a bit, but Italy soon began to press again and forced a series of corners. Wicksell was injured seriously in the back and was obliged to leave the field but, just before half time, E. Börjesson, the Swedish centre forward, almost succeeded in equalizing with a hard shot.

 

During the second half there was a change in the game. Fatigued by their exertions during the first 45 minutes, the Italians kept almost entirely on the defensive, while the Swedes did everything in their power to regain the ground they had lost. But, apparently as a punishment for their laziness during the first part of the game, Fortune turned its back on them entirely, and although the ball was as good as always within the penalty sphere in front of the Italian goal, it was impossible for the Swedes to equalize. E. Börjesson, Dahlström and Svensson sent in shot after shot, but the Italian goal-keeper saved brilliantly, and when he was unable to reach the ball, the Swedes only managed to hit the cross-bar or the side posts. All their efforts were in vain and they had to leave the field, after having had by far the best of the last half of the game, beaten by 1-0. Italy won, thanks to the unfailing energy of the team, and to the good fortune that attended them. The best men on their side were the outside left, the centre half-back, the backs and the goal-keeper. The Swedes lost on account of their unaccountable indifference during the first half. Only the right back, Erik Bergström, and the two outside half-backs, Wicksell and Gustafsson, maintained their reputations, the play of the other members of the team being considerably below par.

 

CONSOLATION SERIES — 1/2 FINAL

STADIUM: Råsunda Idrottsplats (Solna, Stockholm)

DATE: 3-07-1912 (15:00 h)

ATTENDANCE: 200

REFEREE: Christiaan Groothoff (NED)

GOALS: 0-1 (Schlosser 8’); 0-2 (Schlosser 40’); 1-2 (Förderer 56’); 1-3 (Schlosser 82’)

INCIDENTS: FIFA credits Schlosser with his first goal in minute 5.

GER

Deutschland

Germany - Hungary

Magyarország

HUN

1-3 (0-2)

GERMANY

Werner

Röpnack, Hollstein

Krogmann, Ugi (c), Bosch

Wegele, Förderer, Fuchs, Oberle, Hirsch

COACH: —

HUNGARY

Domonkos

Rumbold, Payer

Vágó (c), Szüry, Blum

Sebestyén, Bodnár, Fekete, Schlosser, Borbás

COACH: Ede Herczog

OLYMPIC REPORT

There were only a couple of hundred spectators of this match which, however, was one of great interest the whole of the time, and well worth watching. Hungary lost the toss but, during the first few minutes, was too aggressive to suit the German defence, and their inside left made a lovely goal, only eight minutes after the start. By degrees, however, Germany began to get going, and some good combination by their forwards gave the Hungarian half-backs and backs plenty to do. The fine play of the latter, together with the trick the Germans had of continually being off-side, saved a good many dangerous situations, and when Germany began to slacken pace a little, Hungary was quite ready to renew the attack. But the same fault the team had exhibited in its play against Great Britain once more became evident — its incapacity to do any calm, well-calculated work in front of goal being as great as ever. Numberless fine opportunities of scoring were thrown away, but just before half time, the inside left again made a beautiful goal.

 

It was clear that the lead Hungary had thus obtained was quite sufficient to give them the victory, but Germany worked with undiminished vigour, and, during the second half, had something more than its own share of the game. Now, as in the first half, the Hungarian forwards were unable to make any use of several fine opportunities, and Germany was the first to score during the second forty-five, though the goal should have been disallowed, as it was a clear case of offside. After half an hour, however, came Hungary’s third goal, from a corner, and this settled their opponents’ fate. Hungary well deserved its victory, but it ought to have had at least twice the number of goals it won by. The German goal-keeper had a very succesful day.

 

CONSOLATION SERIES — 1/2 FINAL

STADIUM: Olympiastadion (Stockholm)

DATE: 3-07-1912 (19:00 h)

ATTENDANCE: 3.500

REFEREE: Herbert Willing (NED)

GOALS: 0-1 (Müller 30’); 0-2 (Grundwald 40’); 0-3 (Hussak 49’); 0-4 (Studnička 65’); 1-4 (Berardo 81’); 1-5 (Grundwald 89’)

ITA

Italia

Italy - Austria

Österreich

AUT

1-5 (0-2)

ITALY

Campelli

De Vecchi, Valle

Binaschi, G. Milano (c), Leone

Zuffi, Bontadini, Berardo, Barbesino, Mariani

COACH: Vittorio Pozzo

AUSTRIA

Kaltenbrunner

Braunsteiner, Graubart

Weber, Brandstätter, Cimera

Hussak, Müller, Studnička (c), Grundwald, Neubauer

COACH: Jimmy Hogan

OLYMPIC REPORT

This semi-final of the “Consolation-series” was very poorly supported too, but in contrast with the one just described, the play was hardly up to the level of that shown in the preceding matches. During the first forty-five minutes especially, it was often a matter of very great difficulty indeed to follow the play with any interest. Austria had the upper hand the whole of the time, but the unceremonious play of the Italian defence seemed, at first, to make the, physically speaking, weaker Austrian forwards quite dumbfounded, time after time, when these latter were in the neighbourhood of the Italian goal. After 30 minutes’ monotonous play, however, Austria at length got its first goal, scored by Alois Müller, the inside right. The next minute, Berardo, the Italian centre forward, neglected a beautiful opportunity of equalizing, and play was at once transferred to the Italian quarters, where Campelli’s charge, five minutes before half time, was disturbed by Grundwald.

 

The second forty-five brought several more goals and thus became somewhat pleasanter to look at. The Austrian forwards at length managed to find their right game and, four minutes after play recommenced, Hussak ran in with the ball towards the Italian goal, Austria’s success on this occasion being repeated immediately afterwards, in consequence of a bad blunder by their opponents’ defence. By means of a last despairing rally, the Italians succeeded in penetrating the Austrian lines successfully, but this goal was immediately afterwards nullified by one for the other side just before the whistle sounded, and the Austrians left the field victorious by 5 goals to 1. The Italians could not at all manage to repeat the fine and energetic play they had shown against Sweden. During the second half, the Austrian forwards did the best piece of work of all of their performances during the Olympic competitions, and it was only Campelli’s fine show in goal that kept the result of the play within reasonable proportions.

 

CONSOLATION SERIES — FINAL

STADIUM: Råsunda Idrottsplats (Solna, Stockholm)

DATE: 5-07-1912 (19:00 h)

ATTENDANCE: 5.000

REFEREE: Herbert Willing (NED)

GOALS: 1-0 (Schlosser 32’); 2-0 (Pataki 63’); 3-0 (Bodnár 72’)

HUN

Magyarország

Hungary - Austria

Österreich

AUT

3-0 (1-0)

HUNGARY

Domonkos

Rumbold, Payer

Bíró, Vágó (c), Blum

Sebestyén, Bodnár, Pataki, Schlosser, Borbás

COACH: Ede Herczog

AUSTRIA

Kaltenbrunner

Kurpiel, Graubart

Cimera, Braunsteiner, Brandstätter

Hussak (c), Müller, Merz, Neubauer, Grundwald

COACH: Jimmy Hogan

OLYMPIC REPORT

As was to be expected, national feeling played no unimportant part in this match, and Mr. Willing’s rôle — as peacemaker — was anything but a sinecure. A rougher game has never been played in Sweden, and it was only the fear of causing the scandal to assume still greater proportions that prevented the referee from ordering several of the players of both sides off the field. The whistle was heard incessantly for free kicks, and on one occasion Mr. Willing was obliged to call the teams together and admonish them to play a more gentlemanly game. Very naturally, the game suffered greatly in consequence of these continual fouls and interruptions, but in spite of this, the match was a most interesting one. The big, powerfully-built and speedy Hungarians played the whole of the time as if they were in an ecstasy, and, at times, the pace was quite abnormal. The brilliant Hungarian outside forwards centered towards goal time after time, but the very agile Kaltenbrunner cleared the hard shots from Schlosser and Bodnár superbly. It took no less than 30 minutes’ play to produce the first goal, this coming off Schlosser’s foot, the Hungarian reaching the ball the fraction of a second before Kaltenbrunner, and poking it into the net. Half time came with the score 1-0 in favour of Hungary.

 

The second half saw the culmination of the foul play which had been visible during the first half, and soon a short pause had to be made in order to allow the hot blood of the players to cool a little. After this pause came the best play of the match. The Austrian forwards combined better than those of Hungary, but the latter’s backs, Rumbold especially, played brilliantly, and Domonkos was seldom obliged to put his hand to the ball. After 27 minutes, Hungary’s lead was increased by Pataki, who took a pass to centre by Borbás and easily placed it into the net. Then Hungary began to force the game, sending the ball from wing to wing, with the result that Bodnár, after a brilliant individual attack, gave Hungary its third and finest goal. The Hungarians thus became the well-deserving winners of the consolation series. Their best men for the day were the left wing, Borbás and Schlosser, and the right back, Rumbold. Austria had more of the game than the goal-total shows. Kaltenbrunner, Braunsteiner and Merz playing a superb game.

 

 

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