I OLYMPIC FOOTBALL TOURNAMENT (LONDON 1908)

GAME DETAILS

(From 19-10-1908 to 24-10-1908)

 

*NOTE: Due to the scarce, confusing, and sometimes contradictory information about the early Olympic football games, I include the original Olympic reports for each match (only the spelling of players’ names and the syntax has been corrected and edited). In general, goal scorers, scoring times and line-ups are based on these reports; whatever discrepancies with the two other main sources consulted (FIFA and RSSSF) are indicated in the section INCIDENTS.

 

 

FIRST ROUND

STADIUM: White City Stadium (London)

DATE: 19-10-1908 (15:00 h)

ATTENDANCE: 2.000

REFEREE: Thomas Kyle (GBR)

GOALS: 0-1 (N. Middelboe 10’); 0-2 (Wolfhagen 15’); 0-3 (Wolfhagen 17’); 0-4 (Bohr 25’); 0-5 (Bohr 46’); 0-6 (N. Middelboe 50’); 0-7 (Wolfhagen 67’); 0-8 (Wolfhagen 72’); 0-9 (Nielsen 78’)

FRA

France

France “B” - Denmark

Danmark

DEN

0-9 (0-4)

FRANCE “B”

Desrousseaux

Verlet (c), Bilot

Dastarac, Gressier, Vialaret

Six, Jenicot, Holgard, Mathaux, Filez

COACH: —

DENMARK

Drescher

Von Buchwald, H. Hansen

Bohr, K. Middelboe (c), N. Middelboe

Nørland, Lindgren, Nielsen, Wolfhagen, Andersen

COACH: Charles Williams

OLYMPIC REPORT

On the afternoon of October 19, after twelve minutes, N. Middelboe scored the first goal for the Danes. Five minutes later Wolffhagen kicked the second, and soon afterwards the third. Bohr made it four to love by half-time. Bohr and N. Middelboe again increased the total after the interval, and the Danes kept on shooting till the finish, when they won by 9 to 0. The French were not able to play their best team, and only troubled the Danish goalkeeper two or three times during the game. The turf in the centre of the Stadium was slippery, and the weather both misty and uncomfortable.

 

FIRST ROUND

STADIUM: White City Stadium (London)

DATE: 20-10-1908 (15:00 h)

ATTENDANCE: 2.000

REFEREE: John Ibbotson (GBR)

GOALS: 1-0 (Stapley 15’); 2-0 (Woodward xx’); 3-0 (Berry xx’); 4-0 (Chapman xx’); 5-0 (Purnell xx’); 6-0 (Woodward xx’); 7-0 (Purnell xx’); 7-1 (Bergström 65’); 8-1 (Purnell xx’); 9-1 (Hawkes xx’); 10-1 (Stapley xx’); 11-1 (Hawkes xx’); 12-1 (Purnell xx’)

INCIDENTS: FIFA credits the sixth, seventh, ninth and tenth British goals to Stapley, Woodward, Purnell and Hawkes (respectively).

GBR

Great Britain

Great Britain - Sweden

Sverige

SWE

12-1 (7-0)

GREAT BRITAIN

Bailey

Corbett, Smith

Hunt, Chapman, Hawkes

Berry, Woodward (c), Stapley, Purnell, Hardman

COACH: Alfred Davis

SWEDEN

Bengtsson

Fjästad, Malm

Olsson, Lindman (c), O. Ohlsson

Almkvist, Bergström, Gustafsson, S. Ohlsson, Ansén

COACH: Ludvig Kornerup

OLYMPIC REPORT

On the afternoon of October 20 this match was played on the grass in the middle of the Stadium, the English team being amateurs chosen by the Football Association. The Swedes were beaten by 12 goals to one, but the difference would have been by no means as great if their forwards had been able to keep cool when in front of goal instead of shooting wildly. This excitement was doubtless due to a want of experience, and nothing but time can cure it. Except when they were near goal, the forwards were good, being very fast and not to be put off their game by charging or bustling. S. Ohlsson and the two outsides, Ansén and Almkvist, were especially good. Circumstances were favourable to them, for as Hawkes was generally out of his place the right wing often had to deal with no one but Smith who, besides being slower than he was, cannot kick unless the ball is coming straight to him. Hunt and Chapman played a sound game, but as a rule a rush by the Swedes did not come to an end until the shot had been taken. Although the home forwards did not play particularly well, it was soon seen that the Swedish backs and half-backs were no match for them, and when Woodward and Berry began to interchange places, the back and half-back opposed to them were bewildered.

 

Like the home team, the Swedes were very much stronger in attack than in defence. Their goalkeeper did many clever things, and it was not his fault that his side was so severely beaten. The Swedes ought to have scored the first goal of the match, for from a long kick to the left wing Ansén took the ball up the ground at a great pace, passing beautifully to Gustaf Bergström, who, coming with a rush, had the misfortune to hit the post with his shot. Goals were then scored so quickly for the home team by Stapley, Woodward, Berry, and Chapman that the Swedes seemed in danger of going to pieces, but they rallied with great pluck. Taking advantage of the absence of Hawkes, who was among the forwards, the right wing ran up very quickly, and easily eluding Smith, Almkvist passed straight to the unmarked centre, only to see him shoot wildly.

 

Before half-time the score of the home team had been increased by Purnell (twice) and Woodward. For nearly half an hour after the interval the Swedes held their own, and not only prevented the home team from scoring, but missed several good chances. At last, after they made a long and determined attack, they were rewarded with success, Bergström sending the ball into the net off Chapman. This was their last effort, and goals were scored in quick succession against them by Purnell (two), Hawkes (two), and Stapley.

 

1/2 FINAL

STADIUM: White City Stadium (London)

DATE: 22-10-1908 (13:00 h)

ATTENDANCE: 6.000

REFEREE: John Howcroft (GBR)

GOALS: 1-0 (Stapley 37’); 2-0 (Stapley 60’); 3-0 (Stapley 64’); 4-0 (Stapley 75’)

GBR

Great Britain

Great Britain - Netherlands

Nederland

NED

4-0 (1-0)

GREAT BRITAIN

Bailey

Corbett, Smith

Hunt, Chapman, Hawkes

Berry, Woodward (c), Stapley, Purnell, Hardman

COACH: Alfred Davis

NETHERLANDS

Beeuwkes

Heijting, Otten

Sol, De Korver, Mundt (c)

Welcker, Snethlage, Reeman, Thomée, De Bruijn Kops

COACH: Edgar Chadwick

OLYMPIC REPORT

The visitors from the first created a favourable impression, being stalwart and fast, quick on the ball, and fairly clever with their feet. Their defence was very strong, the backs being cool and resourceful. The forwards had evidently been well trained in passing, but their adherence to routine was carried to excess. With a little more confidence in their own powers and better judgment in shooting they would have gone very near to winning, especially as the English team did not show to great advantage in any department, and the wing forwards alone gave evidence of international form. The Dutch goalkeeper early in the game was called upon to deal with a number of shots, but he was equal to all demands. For Holland Snethlage was often conspicuous, but he was somewhat too unselfish — a failing which developed as the game proceeded.

 

Nothing was scored until but a few minutes remained of the first half, and so well was the Dutch goal covered that up to this point there was little promise of success for the somewhat feeble efforts of the English forwards. A lucky goal, however, now fell to the home team, Stapley back-heeling the ball somewhat speculatively and seeing it trickle into the net off the goalkeeper’s hand and the post. In the second half a blunder by Corbett left the visiting forwards in possession near goal, but Bailey was able to stop the ensuing shot. Stapley scored again, being presented with a clear run between the backs after a free kick, and the same player gained another point within a few minutes by meeting one of Hardman’s high middles close up. A fourth goal fell to Stapley from a pass forward by Chapman which again left him an opening between the backs. Welcker made a number of good runs and middles for Holland, but his comrades could not turn them to account, and the half-backs were not very skilful in supporting an attack, the game ending in favour of the United Kingdom by four goals to none.

 

1/2 FINAL

STADIUM: White City Stadium (London)

DATE: 22-10-1908 (15:00 h)

ATTENDANCE: 1.000

REFEREE: Thomas Campbell (GBR)

GOALS: 0-1 (Nielsen 3’); 0-2 (Nielsen 4’); 0-3 (Nielsen 6’); 1-3 (Sartorius 16’); 1-4 (Lindgren 18’); 1-5 (Lindgren 37’); 1-6 (Nielsen 39’); 1-7 (Nielsen 46’); 1-8 (Nielsen 48’); 1-9 (Nielsen 52’); 1-10 (Wolfhagen 60’); 1-11 (Nielsen 64’); 1-12 (Nielsen 66’); 1-13 (N. Middelboe 68’); 1-14 (Wolfhagen 72’); 1-15 (Nielsen 76’); 1-16 (Wolfhagen 82’); 1-17 (Wolfhagen 89’)

FRA

France

France “A” - Denmark

Danmark

DEN

1-17 (1-6)

FRANCE “A”

Tillette

J. Dubly, Wibaut

Bayrou, Schubart, Renaux

Fenouillière, Cyprès, François (c), Albert, Sartorius

COACH: —

DENMARK

Drescher

Von Buchwald, H. Hansen

Bohr, K. Middelboe (c), N. Middelboe

Gandil, Lindgren, Nielsen, Wolfhagen, Rasmussen

COACH: Charles Williams

OLYMPIC REPORT

In the absence of the three selected half-backs, and with a goalkeeper who was occasionally brilliant but generally most indifferent, this eleven [France “A”] proved to be even weaker in defence than the second team. The forwards were not bad individually, but had little idea of combination, and passed much too hard. Nor did the half-backs know how to feed them, so that they never had a chance of carrying out a serious attack, although they often took the ball into Danish quarters. As a full back Wibaut had many strong points, and could kick well. The match was merely a repetition of Denmark vs. France “B”, with the exception that the French goalkeeper was greatly inferior to Desrousseaux, and that the Danish defence, which had not been tested on Monday, was found to be sadly wanting. In both matches the Frenchmen, particularly the backs and half-backs, were by far too much given to waiting on an opponent who had the ball instead of going for him.

 

Of the actual play there is little to be said. Denmark at once attacked, and in about five minutes Nielsen scored three goals. Then for the first time France became aggressive, but although the two Danish backs and the goalkeeper each made a bad mistake which ought to have proved fatal, the French forwards made no attempt whatever to seize their chances. Another bad mistake by one of the Danish backs had not so fortunate an ending for his side, for Sartorius, coming clear, and running on without hesitation, shot well and at the right time, and gave the Frenchmen their only goal. Before half-time Lindgren (twice) and Nielsen added to the Danish score. In the second half the Frenchmen occasionally made inroads into Danish territory, but could never push their attacks home, while goals were scored for Denmark by Nielsen (six), Wolfhagen (four), and N. Middelboe.

 

PLACES 3-4

STADIUM: White City Stadium (London)

DATE: 23-10-1908 (15:00 h)

ATTENDANCE: 1.000

REFEREE: John Pearson (GBR)

GOALS: 1-0 (Reeman 6’); 2-0 (Snethlage 58’)

INCIDENTS: Sweden replaced France “A” in the consolation final after the French, shocked by their humiliating 17-1 defeat in semifinals, refused to play the game for the bronze medal. With Netherlands leading 1-0, Bergström missed a penalty shot, saved by Beeuwkes.

NED

Nederland

Netherlands - Sweden

Sverige

SWE

2-0 (1-0)

NETHERLANDS

Beeuwkes

Heijting, Otten

Sol, De Korver (c), Kok

Welcker, Snethlage, Reeman, Thomée, De Bruijn Kops

COACH: Edgar Chadwick

SWEDEN

Bengtsson

Fjästad, Andersson

Olsson, Lindman (c), Lidén

Fagrell, Bergström, Gustafsson, O. Ohlsson, Ansén

COACH: Ludvig Kornerup

OLYMPIC REPORT

Holland and Sweden played for the consolation stakes, and the former scored two goals to one from Sweden, who were rather unlucky in not getting a second. The bronze medals therefore went to Holland.

 

FINAL

STADIUM: White City Stadium (London)

DATE: 24-10-1908 (15:00 h)

ATTENDANCE: 8.000

REFEREE: John Lewis (GBR)

GOALS: 1-0 (Chapman 20’); 2-0 (Woodward 65’)

INCIDENTS: FIFA credits Woodward with the second English goal in minute 46, but the official Olympic report states that it was scored twenty minutes after halftime (see below).

GBR

Great Britain

Great Britain - Denmark

Danmark

DEN

2-0 (1-0)

GREAT BRITAIN

Bailey

Corbett, Smith

Hunt, Chapman, Hawkes

Berry, Woodward (c), Stapley, Purnell, Hardman

COACH: Alfred Davis

DENMARK

Drescher

Von Buchwald, H. Hansen

Bohr, K. Middelboe (c), N. Middelboe

Nørland, Lindgren, Nielsen, Wolfhagen, Rasmussen

COACH: Charles Williams

OLYMPIC REPORT

It was the general opinion that though the United Kingdom won by two goals to none, even this slight difference in score rather flattered the winners, who did not often show real international form. Denmark, on the other hand, displayed the greatest vigour and determination, with far more pace and dash than they had against France, and they played much better together than the English. Kristian Middelboe, at centre-half, fed his forwards with persistent accuracy. The first English goal was scored when Drescher slipped in the Danish net and was unable to attempt to stop Chapman, not long after the start. After this the Danish halves continually spoilt the English attacks and prevented them getting anything like a combined movement. Lindgren had got past everyone but Bailey when Hawkes just stopped him in time. Soon after, Drescher made a clever save from Stapley. Purnell’s goal was disallowed for offside play. Woodward was too carefully watched to be able to shoot.

 

After half-time Denmark started with a vigorous rush, and for some time had the best of the game, though their forwards did not shoot well when they had a chance. Bailey was equal to his work, and had more of it than he liked. After twenty minutes, Woodward scored for England with a magnificent shot quite out of Drescher’s reach. The Danes seemed only inspired to even greater efforts by their second reverse, and Lindgren was loudly cheered for a long run which was only ended without a score when Bailey threw himself full-length at the ball. The game went up and down the field, and Denmark was doing more than her share of pressing when the whistle sounded, and the United Kingdom won a hard-fought game by two to love.

 

 

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