X EUROPEAN CHAMPIONSHIP (ENGLAND 1996)

FINAL STAGE — GAME DETAILS

(From 8-06-1996 to 30-06-1996)

 

 

GROUP STAGE

STADIUM: Wembley (London)

DATE: 8-06-1996 (15:00 h)

ATTENDANCE: 76.567

REFEREE: Manuel Díaz Vega (SPA)

GOALS: 1-0 (Shearer 23'); 1-1 (Türkyılmaz [p.] 83')

ENG

England

England - Switzerland

Schweiz / Suisse

SWI

1-1 (1-0)

ENGLAND

Seaman

G. Neville, Adams (c), Southgate, Pearce

Anderton, Ince, Gascoigne (Platt 77'), McManaman (Stone 70')

Shearer, Sheringham (Barmby 70')

COACH: Terry Venables

SWITZERLAND

Pascolo

Jeanneret, Geiger (c) (Koller 71'), Vega, Henchoz

Quentin, Bonvin (Chapuisat 67'), Sforza, Vogel

Türkyılmaz, Grassi

COACH: Artur Jorge Braga

GAME SUMMARY

England began the game in a lively fashion as McManaman stormed down the left wing and crossed to Anderton, whose weak shot was saved by Pascolo. Although Switzerland threatened a few minutes later when Türkyılmaz spurted past Adams on the edge of the penalty area, England dominated most of the first half. In minute 23, Shearer—who had failed to score in his twelve previous internationals—latched onto a through-pass from Ince and drove the ball home at the near post to open the scoring. Playing with confidence, England continued to attack the Swiss goal, particularly from the left flank, where McManaman created all kinds of problems for his defenders. However, a second English goal failed to materialize and Switzerland, inspired by Sforza, began to take control of midfield as Gascoigne and Ince faded. A few minutes before halftime Grassi could have equalized, but his shot hit the bar.

 

In the second half, England faded and the home fans staggered when manager Venables substituted the one player who was causing the Swiss problems, McManaman. Devoid of ideas, England struggled to hold the rampant Switzerland and the equalizer seemed inevitable. In minute 83 Pearce was unfortunate to concede a penalty when the ball struck his hand and Türkyılmaz gave Seaman no chance as he levelled the score. Both sides then had opportunities to score a winner but, in the end, seemed happy to settle for a draw.

 

GROUP STAGE

STADIUM: Elland Road (Leeds)

DATE: 9-06-1996 (14:30 h)

ATTENDANCE: 24.006

REFEREE: Piero Ceccarini (ITA)

GOALS: 0-1 (Stoichkov [p.] 65'); 1-1 (Alfonso 74')

[Incidents: Khubchev (min. 72) and Pizzi (min. 75) were both sent off.]

SPA

España

Spain - Bulgaria

България

BUL

1-1 (0-0)

SPAIN

Zubizarreta (c)

Belsué, Alkorta, Abelardo, Sergi

Caminero (Donato 82'), Hierro, Amor (Alfonso 70'), Luis Enrique

Guerrero (Amavisca 51'), Pizzi

COACH: Javier Clemente

BULGARIA

Mikhajlov (c)

Kishishev, Ivanov, Yankov, Khubchev, Kirjakov (Tsvetanov 72')

Lechkov, Balăkov, Penev (Borimirov 78'), Kostadinov (Yordanov 73')

Stoichkov

COACH: Dimităr Penev

GAME SUMMARY

Both sides started the game nervously. Spain had the best opportunities in the first quarter, and Julen Guerrero should have scored after finding himself with an easy opening, but his poor volley went over the bar. A few minutes later, Hierro came close with a 25-meter drive which Mikhajlov turned away for a corner. Bulgaria’s threat came chiefly from Stoichkov, who caused problems for the Spanish defense whenever he got the ball, but defender Ivanov came closest to scoring in the first half with two long-range efforts.

 

Early in the second half, Stoichkov scored after volleying past Zubizarreta, but his goal was disallowed after the linesman flagged (seemingly incorrectly) for offside. Bulgaria continued to press, and in minute 64 Stoichkov again split the Spanish defense with a tremendous pass to Kostadinov, who was floored by Sergi. The referee immediately gave a penalty, which Stoichkov duly converted, sending Zubizarreta the wrong way. Spain hit back for an equalizer a few minutes later after a bizarre series of events. Firstly, Khubchev received his second booking for a foul on Caminero and was sent off. This happened in minute 70, but it was four minutes before the free kick was taken, as three consecutive substitutions were then made. The Spanish substitute, Alfonso, deflected the free kick into the Bulgarian net with his first touch of the game. Just one minute after the Spanish equalizer, Pizzi was also sent off. With equal numbers, both sides could have scored the winner in the final, confused quarter of the game, but the draw remained until the final whistle.

 

GROUP STAGE

STADIUM: Old Trafford (Manchester)

DATE: 9-06-1996 (17:00 h)

ATTENDANCE: 37.300

REFEREE: David Elleray (ENG)

GOALS: 1-0 (Ziege 26'); 2-0 (Möller 32')

GER

Deutschland

Germany - Czech Republic

Česká Republika

CZR

2-0 (2-0)

GERMANY

Köpke

Reuter, Kohler (c) (Babbel 14'), Sammer, Helmer, Ziege

Eilts, Häßler, Möller

Bobič (Strunz 65'), Kuntz (Bierhoff 83')

COACH: Berti Vogts

CZECH REPUBLIC

Kouba (c)

Horňák, Kadlec, Suchopárek

Látal, Frýdek (Drulák 46'), Bejbl, Němec, Nedvěd

Kuka, Poborský (Berger 46’)

COACH: Dušan Uhrin

GAME SUMMARY

Germany, without the injured Klinsmann, suffered an early blow when Kohler was carried off with a serious injury which was to sideline him for the rest of the tournament. In minute 26 the German fullback Ziege burst from defense and sent a low drive in off the post to put Germany ahead. Minutes later, Möller made it 2-0 and, although the Czechs squandered chances to get back into the game, Germany dominated the rest of the match and run out easy winners.

 

GROUP STAGE

STADIUM: Hillsborough (Sheffield)

DATE: 9-06-1996 (19:30 h)

ATTENDANCE: 34.993

REFEREE: Mario van der Ende (NED)

GOALS: 1-0 (B. Laudrup 22'); 1-1 (Sá Pinto 53')

DEN

Danmark

Denmark - Portugal

Portugal

POR

1-1 (1-0)

DENMARK

Schmeichel

Helveg, J. Høgh, Rieper, Risager

B. Laudrup, Thomsen (Piechnik 83'), B. Nielsen, Larsen (Vilfort 90')

M. Laudrup (c), Beck

COACH: Richard Møller Nielsen

PORTUGAL

Vítor Baía (c)

Paulinho Santos, Fernando Couto, Hélder, Dimas

P. Sousa (Tavares 79'), Oceano (A. Folha 37'), Figo (Domingos 62')

Sá Pinto, Rui Costa, João Pinto

COACH: António Oliveira

GAME SUMMARY

The defending champion Denmark opened against Portugal and were quickly forced onto the defensive. Playing with great flair, Portugal threatened to run riot against an unimpressive Danish side, but goalkeeper Schmeichel was in sparkling form and saved his team time and again. Then, midway the first half and much against the run of play, Brian Laudrup put Denmark ahead. Although Portugal continued to press for a goal, the score remained 1-0 at halftime. The equalizer came in the 53rd minute, when Sá Pinto headed home, and, thereafter, the game settled down to a much more even pattern as the Danes got to grips with the Portuguese attack. Both sides came close to scoring again, but the sense of urgency seemed to have evaporated as they coasted down to a 1-1 draw.

 

GROUP STAGE

STADIUM: Villa Park (Birmingham)

DATE: 10-06-1996 (16:30 h)

ATTENDANCE: 34.363

REFEREE: Leif Sundell (SWE)

GOALS: -

NED

Nederland

Netherlands - Scotland

Scotland

SCO

0-0 (0-0)

NETHERLANDS

Van der Sar

Reiziger, De Kock, Bogarde

De Boer (c) (Winter 68'), Seedorf, Davids, Witschge (Cocu 78')

Taument (Kluivert 63'), Bergkamp, Cruijff

COACH: Guus Hiddink

SCOTLAND

Goram

McKimmie (Burley 85'), Hendry, Boyd, Calderwood

Collins, McAllister (c), McCall, Gallacher (B. McKinlay 56')

Durie, Booth (Spencer 46')

COACH: Craig Brown

GAME SUMMARY

The game began with a Dutch onslaught upon the Scottish goal. Playing with three out-and-out attackers—Taument and Jordi Cruijff on the wings and Bergkamp in the center—, Holland threatened to overwhelm the Scots and, in the sixth minute, Goram saved brilliantly from Seedorf. From the resulting corner, Ronald de Boer saw his shot handled on the goal line by Collins but, fortunately for Scotland, the referee’s view was obscured by other players and the Dutch appeals for a penalty were ignored. This early scare seemed to motivate the Scots, who started to grab the initiative, and both Collins and McAllister had shots saved by Van der Sar. As the game progressed, Scotland began to show why they had conceded only three goals in their ten qualifying matches, and Holland struggled to open the score. Davids and Seedorf were ineffectual in the midfield, and it was Scotland who threatened the greatest danger, despite Bergkamp missing the easiest chance of the first half.

 

In the second half, Scotland created more chances when Spencer came on as substitute for Booth, but in the absence of Duncan Ferguson (injured) they still lacked a striker who was capable of penetrating the Dutch defense. Holland showed flashes of brilliance and should have scored when Seedorf missed an easy header but, in the end, a goalless draw was a fair result which left both sides with their chances of qualifying intact.

 

GROUP STAGE

STADIUM: Saint James' Park (Newcastle)

DATE: 10-06-1996 (19:30 h)

ATTENDANCE: 26.323

REFEREE: Hellmut Krug (GER)

GOALS: 0-1 (Dugarry 25')

ROM

România

Romania - France

France

FRA

0-1 (0-1)

ROMANIA

Stelea

Petrescu (Filipescu 78'), Belodedici, Mihali, Selymes

Hagi (c), Popescu, Lupescu, Munteanu

Lăcătuş (Ilie 56'), Răducioiu (Moldovan 46')

COACH: Anghel lordănescu

FRANCE

Lama

Thuram, Blanc, Desailly, Di Meco (Lizarazu 68')

Karembeu, Deschamps (c), Guérin

Djorkaeff, Dugarry (Loko 68'), Zidane (Roche 80')

COACH: Aimé Jacquet

GAME SUMMARY

In an uninspiring game, France were surprisingly dominated by Romania in the opening exchanges. Despite this, the French took the lead in minute 25 with a farcical goal which knocked the stuffing out of Romania: Djorkaeff sent over a cross from the right and Stelea flattened his own defender, Mihali, who had jumped to challenge Dugarry, and the ball looped goalward off Dugarry’s head. Romania were then left to chase the game. Hagi posed the chief Romanian threat, but his two first-half shots of note were easily saved by Lama. In the second half, although Romania continued to press for an equalizer, France were seriously troubled only once and came close to extending their lead on several occasions. The score remained 1-0 and neither side could draw much comfort from their opening performance.

 

GROUP STAGE

STADIUM: Anfield (Liverpool)

DATE: 11-06-1996 (16:30 h)

ATTENDANCE: 35.120

REFEREE: Leslie Mottram (SCO)

GOALS: 1-0 (Casiraghi 5'); 1-1 (Tsymbalar’ 21'); 2-1 (Casiraghi 52')

ITA

Italia

Italy - Russia

Россия

RUS

2-1 (1-1)

ITALY

Peruzzi

Mussi, Costacurta, Apolloni, Maldini (c)

Di Livio (Fuser 62'), Albertini, Di Matteo

Del Piero (Donadoni 46'), Casiraghi (Ravanelli 80'), Zola

COACH: Arrigo Sacchi

RUSSIA

Cherchesov (c)

Tetradze, Bushmanov (Yanovskij 46'), Onopko, Kovtun

Kanchel’skis, Radimov, Mostovoj, Tsymbalar’ (Dobrovol’skij 71')

Karpin (Kir’jakov 63'), Kolyvanov

COACH: Oleg Romantsev

GAME SUMMARY

Italy took an early lead through Casiraghi, although the Russians protested—with justification—that the Italian attacker was offside when he received the ball. Playing excellent flowing football, Russia fought their way back into the game and equalized in the 21st minute through Tsymbalar’. As play swung from end to end, Russia began to dominate the game and Italy’s reknowned defense struggled to hold their opponents.

 

Fortunate to still be on level terms at halftime, Italy reorganized their midfield by bringing on Donadoni in place of Del Piero, and his presence turned the game in their favor. Seven minutes into the second half, Casiraghi scored his second goal and Russia faded against the rejuvenated Italians. Ravanelli, who replaced Casiraghi with ten minutes left to play, should have put Italy further ahead when he wasted two easy chances. In injury-time, substitute Dobrovol’skij let Italy off the hook when he squandered a simple opportunity to equalize and the score remained 2-1 to Italy.

 

GROUP STAGE

STADIUM: City Ground (Nottingham)

DATE: 11-06-1996 (19:30 h)

ATTENDANCE: 22.460

REFEREE: Serge Muhmenthaler (SWI)

GOALS: 0-1 (Vlaović 86')

TUR

Türkiye

Turkey - Croatia

Hrvatska

CRO

0-1 (0-0)

TURKEY

ş

Vedat, Rahim, Alpay

Ogün (c), Tolunay (Saffet 88'), Tugay, Abdullah

Arif (Hami 82'), Hakan Şükür, Sergen

COACH: Fatih Terim

CROATIA

Ladić

Štimac, Jerkan, Bilić

Stanić, Prosinečki, Boban (c) (Soldo 57'), Asanović, Jarni

Šuker (Pavličić 90'), Bokšić (Vlaović 73')

COACH: Miroslav Blažević

GAME SUMMARY

An enormous number of Turkish supporters amongst the crowd provided much vocal encouragement for their team, who failed dismally to respond with much positive play. The Croats themselves added little to the spectacle and seemed content to defend in depth, relying on the occasional break to threaten the Turkish goal. In the final quarter of the game, Croatia brought on Vlaović for Bokšić and his presence immediately lifted the Croat’s game when he almost scored with his first touch. With only four minutes remaining, Vlaović latched onto a clearance from Asanović and ran the whole length of the Turkish half pursued by fullback Alpay before calmly walking the ball into the net for the winner.

 

GROUP STAGE

STADIUM: Saint James' Park (Newcastle)

DATE: 13-06-1996 (16:30 h)

ATTENDANCE: 19.107

REFEREE: Peter Mikkelsen (DEN)

GOALS: 1-0 (Stoichkov 3')

[Incidents: In minute 31, Munteanu scored a “ghost goal:” his shot was deflected by the crossbar and bounced clearly beyond the goal line, but it went out again. Surprisingly, the referee didn't validate the goal.]

BUL

България

Bulgaria - Romania

România

ROM

1-0 (1-0)

BULGARIA

Mikhajlov (c)

Kishishev, Ivanov, Yankov, Tsvetanov

Lechkov (Genchev 90'), Yordanov, Balăkov

Kostadinov (Borimirov 32'), Penev (Sirakov 72'), Stoichkov

COACH: Dimităr Penev

ROMANIA

Stelea

Petrescu, Prodan, Belodedici, Selymes

Hagi (c), Lupescu (Gâlcă 46'), Popescu (Ilie 78'), Munteanu

Răducioiu, Lăcătuş (Moldovan 29')

COACH: Anghel lordănescu

GAME SUMMARY

The “Clash of the Balkans” was billed as the Hagi vs. Stoichkov game, and it was the latter who came out on top. In only the third minute he took on the Romanian defense before smashing a superb shot past Stelea. Undeterred, Romania fought their way back into the game and pressed Bulgaria for an equalizer. At the half hour, Munteanu struck a powerful shot which hit the underside of the bar before bouncing behind the goal line, but the Danish referee Mikkelsen was so confident that the ball had not crossed the line that he disallowed the goal without even consulting his linesman. The Romanians, astonished by this decision, protested in vain, but continued to press for the equalizer. In the second half, continued Romanian pressure resulted in few clear-cut chances, and although defender Prodan came closest to equalizing, Lechkov almost made it 2-0 in the closing minutes. The score remained 1-0 at the end of the game and Romania became the first team to go out of the tournament.

 

GROUP STAGE

STADIUM: Villa Park (Birmingham)

DATE: 13-06-1996 (19:30 h)

ATTENDANCE: 36.800

REFEREE: Atanas Uzunov (BUL)

GOALS: 0-1 (Cruijff 66'); 0-2 (Bergkamp 79')

SWI

Schweiz / Suisse

Switzerland - Netherlands

Nederland

NED

0-2 (0-0)

SWITZERLAND

Pascolo

Jeanneret (Comisetti 69'), Vega, Henchoz, Quentin

Hottiger, Sforza (c), Vogel

Grassi, Türkyılmaz, Chapuisat

COACH: Artur Jorge Braga

NETHERLANDS

Van der Sar

Reiziger, Blind (c), Seedorf (De Kock 26'), Bogarde

Winter, De Boer (Davids 80'), Witschge

Cruijff (Kluivert 84'), Bergkamp, Hoekstra

COACH: Guus Hiddink

GAME SUMMARY

The Dutch team were in the midst of an internal wrangle after an argument between midfielder Edgar Davids and manager Guus Hiddink. Seedorf started the game overexcited: in minute 14 he was booked for a foul on Grassi (his third in only a few minutes), and shortly afterwards seemed to be inviting his own dismissal with a reckless challenge on Türkyılmaz. Hiddink, aware of the risk of being down to ten men if this sort of conduct continued, immediately replaced Seedorf with De Kock. The substitution served to calm the Dutch side and, although Switzerland continued to have the best of the chances in the first half (Chapuisat came close on two occasions), Holland always seemed to pose a threat.

 

Early in the second half, Hottiger should have put Switzerland ahead and, within minutes, both teams squandered further goalscoring chances. In minute 66 it was Jordi Cruijff (the son of Johan Cruijff) who broke the deadlock with a tremendous angled strike from the edge of the area. This goal relieved the Dutch fans and set Holland up for victory. Left with no alternative but to attack, the Swiss left gaps at the back and Bergkamp made it 2-0 thirteen minutes later.

 

GROUP STAGE

STADIUM: City Ground (Nottingham)

DATE: 14-06-1996 (16:30 h)

ATTENDANCE: 22.670

REFEREE: Sándor Puhl (HUN)

GOALS: 1-0 (Fernando Couto 66')

POR

Portugal

Portugal - Turkey

Türkiye

TUR

1-0 (0-0)

PORTUGAL

Vítor Baía (c)

Paulinho Santos, Fernando Couto, Hélder, Dimas

Sá Pinto (Cadete 65'), Paulo Sousa, Rui Costa, Figo

João Pinto (Hugo Porfírio 77'), António Folha (Tavares 46')

COACH: António Oliveira

TURKEY

Rüştü

Alpay, Ogün (Rahim 46'), Vedat

Recep, Oğuz (c) (Arif 69'), Tugay, Sergen, Abdullah

Hakan Şükür, Saffet (Tolunay 63')

COACH: Fatih Terim

GAME SUMMARY

Portugal were little troubled by a Turkish side which lacked any real threat up front. At halftime the score remained goalless and, although Turkey had had the better of the first half, Portugal claimed the best opportunities to open the score (especially an easy chance wasted by Sá Pinto). Sá Pinto was substituted in minute 65 by Cadete, who immediately won a corner for Portugal. The ball came over from the corner via Paulo Sousa, and in the melee which followed Fernando Couto struck the ball past the unsighted keeper. Turkey pressed for the equalizer but, despite pretty approach play, never looked like scoring.

 

GROUP STAGE

STADIUM: Anfield (Liverpool)

DATE: 14-06-1996 (19:30 h)

ATTENDANCE: 37.320

REFEREE: Antonio Jesús López Nieto (SPA)

GOALS: 1-0 (Nedvěd 5'); 1-1 (Chiesa 18'); 2-1 (Bejbl 35')

[Incidents: Apolloni was sent off (min. 29).]

CZR

Česká Republika

Czech Republic - Italy

Italia

ITA

2-1 (2-1)

CZECH REPUBLIC

Kouba

Látal (Němeček 88'), Horňák, Kadlec (c), Suchopárek, Němec

Poborský, Bejbl, Berger (Šmicer 64'), Nedvěd

Kuka

COACH: Dušan Uhrin

ITALY

Peruzzi

Mussi, Apolloni, Costacurta, Maldini (c)

Fuser, Baggio (Carboni 39'), Albertini, Donadoni

Chiesa (Zola 78'), Ravanelli (Casiraghi 58')

COACH: Arrigo Sacchi

GAME SUMMARY

Czech Republic provided the first real upset of the tournament after defeating Italy. Both teams turned on fine displays of footballing skill in a game which could have gone either way. Italy, fielding a greatly changed team from that which had beaten Russia, almost took the lead in the third minute when Chiesa had a fine shot saved. Immediately, the Czechs broke from defense and winger Poborský set up Nedvěd, who smashed the ball into the Italian net. Thirteen minutes later, Poborský again waltzed his way down the Italian right flank, but this time his cross was cleared straight up field and Chiesa was on hand to equalize. In a thrilling game, action swung from end to end and, five minutes later, Nedvěd wasted a chance to score his second when Poborský set him up again. The Italian defense looked increasingly shaky and, minutes later, Apolloni (who had been booked early in the game for a clumsy challenge) hacked down Kuka just inside his own half and was sent off by the Spanish referee López Nieto. Shortly afterwards, before the reorganized Italian rearguard could settle down, Bejbl smashed a first-time shot into their net and Italy were chasing the game.

 

In the second half, Italy continued to keep two men up front and, although hard-pressed in midfield, created a number of opportunities to equalize. Casiraghi came on as substitute for Ravanelli in minute 58 and it was he who could have squared the game in injury-time when he shot over with only goalkeeper Kouba to beat. The score remained 2-1 in the end and Italy knew that they had to beat Germany in their last game if they were to progress to the quarterfinals.

 

GROUP STAGE

STADIUM: Wembley (London)

DATE: 15-06-1996 (15:00 h)

ATTENDANCE: 76.864

REFEREE: Pierluigi Pairetto (ITA)

GOALS: 0-1 (Shearer 53'); 0-2 (Gascoigne 79')

[Incidents: McAllister missed a penalty shot (min. 78), saved by Seaman.]

SCO

Scotland

Scotland - England

England

ENG

0-2 (0-0)

SCOTLAND

Goram

McKimmie, Calderwood, Hendry, Boyd

McCall, McAllister (c), Collins, T. McKinlay (Burley 82')

Spencer (McCoist 67'), Durie (Jess 87')

COACH: Craig Brown

ENGLAND

Seaman

G. Neville, Adams (c), Southgate, Pearce (Redknapp 46' (Camp. 85'))

Anderton, Ince (Stone 78'), Gascoigne, McManaman

Shearer, Sheringham

COACH: Terry Venables

GAME SUMMARY

In a hard-fought game, Scotland had the better of the early chances and their captain Gary McAllister had a shot saved in only the third minute. Seaman looked a little nervous in minute 20 when he flapped at a Collins corner and England were fortunate to scramble the ball clear. Minutes later McAllister was on target again and this time it was the English captain Tony Adams who deflected the ball for a corner. With the game still evenly balanced, England could only muster a few weak attempts on goal and at halftime the score remained 0-0.

 

The substitution of Pearce with Redknapp prompted a very different English performance in the early second half. England seemed to find an extra pace, and a game which had been controlled by defenses suddenly opened up. After five minutes McManaman had a shot which was just off target, and three minutes later Shearer headed England into the lead from a Gary Neville cross. Scotland were rocked back by this strike, but held on as first Anderton and then Sheringham came close to scoring. Despite their lead, England did not have it all their own way and Scotland were particularly dangerous from set pieces, when Hendry and McAllister were threatening. Seaman misjudged a ball from Gary Neville and was penalized for picking up a back pass and, from the resulting free kick, Hendry was unfortunate not to score. In minute 78, Scotland’s pressure seemed to pay off when they were awarded a penalty for a foul by Adams, but McAllister’s spot-kick was deflected by Seaman’s elbow over the bar. Within a minute England secured their victory as Gascoigne struck a memorable goal: collecting the ball on the Scottish right, the English midfielder showed a rare flash of brilliance as he flicked the ball over Hendry, accelerated into the penalty area and hit an unstoppable shot past the advancing keeper.

 

GROUP STAGE

STADIUM: Elland Road (Leeds)

DATE: 15-06-1996 (18:00 h)

ATTENDANCE: 35.626

REFEREE: Vadim Zhuk (BLR)

GOALS: 1-0 (Djorkaeff 48'); 1-1 (Caminero 85')

FRA

France

France - Spain

España

SPA

1-1 (0-0)

FRANCE

Lama

Angloma (Roche 65'), Blanc, Desailly, Lizarazu

Karembeu, Deschamps (c), Guérin (Thuram 81'), Zidane

Djorkaeff, Loko (Dugarry 74')

COACH: Aimé Jacquet

SPAIN

Zubizarreta (c)

Otero (Kiko 59'), López, Abelardo, Sergi

Hierro, Caminero, Alkorta, Amavisca

Luis Enrique (Manjarín 55'), Alfonso (Julio Salinas 83')

COACH: Javier Clemente

GAME SUMMARY

France, unbeaten in their previous 25 games, were regarded by many as the favorites to win the championship. However, without David Ginola and Éric Cantona—who had been surprisingly omitted from the squad by Aimé Jacquet—, their attack lacked any real threat. Zidane, the new “wonder boy” of French football, had played poorly in the opening game against Romania and fared little better against Spain. In a first half dominated by defenses, France came closest to scoring when a shot by Guérin was acrobatically saved by Zubizarreta.

 

Early in the second half, France took the lead through their most threatening forward, Djorkaeff, but then seemed content to defend for the rest of the game. This opened the door for the Spaniards, who soon brought on two substitutes, first Manjarín and then Kiko, who became the target man from both wings. Unsettled by the change of tactics, the French brought on Roche, Dugarry and Thuram and reorganized their defense, but it was the last Spanish substitute, Julio Salinas, who made the greatest impact on the game. Coming on in the 83rd minute, he set up Caminero to drill the ball into the French net for the equalizer. In the final five minutes neither side seemed willing to risk the point and the score remained 1-1.

 

GROUP STAGE

STADIUM: Old Trafford (Manchester)

DATE: 16-06-1996 (15:00 h)

ATTENDANCE: 50.760

REFEREE: Kim Milton Nielsen (DEN)

GOALS: 0-1 (Sammer 56'); 0-2 (Klinsmann 77'); 0-3 (Klinsmann 90')

[Incidents: Kovtun was sent off (min. 70).]

RUS

Россия

Russia - Germany

Deutschland

GER

0-3 (0-0)

RUSSIA

Kharin

Tetradze, Onopko (c), Nikiforov, Kovtun

Kanchel’skis, Khokhlov (Simutenkov 66'), Radimov (Karpin 46')

Mostovoj, Kolyvanov, Tsymbalar’

COACH: Oleg Romantsev

GERMANY

Köpke

Reuter, Babbel, Sammer, Helmer, Ziege

ßler (Freund 67'), Eilts, Möller (Strunz 87')

Klinsmann (c), Bierhoff (Kuntz 85')

COACH: Berti Vogts

GAME SUMMARY

Boosted by the return of Jürgen Klinsmann, Germany had little difficulty in booking their place into the quarterfinals after trouncing Russia 3-0, with two goals of their captain. However, it was the Russians who had the best of an evenly balanced first half, when Tsymbalar’ shot onto the woodwork in minute 5 and the talented Mostovoj was a constant threat for the organized German defense. After the break, Möller started to dominate the midfield and Germany assumed the upper hand. Sammer scored the opener somewhat luckily and Russia pressed hard for the equalizer, but failed to penetrate the German defense. In the final stage of the game, when the Russians started to show symptoms of giving up (especially after Kovtun was sent off), Klinsmann picked up the ball on the edge of the area with his back to goal, dribbled past Nikiforov and sent a superb right-footer into the top corner. A late goal by Klinsmann made it 3-0 and certified the qualification of Germany and the elimination of Russia.

 

GROUP STAGE

STADIUM: Hillsborough (Sheffield)

DATE: 16-06-1996 (18:00 h)

ATTENDANCE: 33.671

REFEREE: Marc Batta (FRA)

GOALS: 1-0 (Šuker [p.] 54'); 2-0 (Boban 81'); 3-0 (Šuker 90')

CRO

Hrvatska

Croatia - Denmark

Danmark

DEN

3-0 (0-0)

CROATIA

Ladić

Bilić, Jerkan, Štimac, Jarni

Stanić, Asanović, Boban (c) (Jurčević 82'), Prosinečki (Mladenović 88')

Šuker, Vlaović (Soldo 82')

COACH: Miroslav Blažević

DENMARK

Schmeichel

Helveg (Laursen 46'), J. Høgh, B. Nielsen, Rieper

Larsen (Tøfting 69'), Thomsen, Vilfort (Beck 59'), Schjønberg

M. Laudrup (c), B. Laudrup

COACH: Richard Møller Nielsen

GAME SUMMARY

Denmark fielded an unbalanced team against Croatia, playing without a single out-and-out striker and relaying instead upon Michael Laudrup and Henrik Larsen to break from midfield. Croatia had the best scoring chances of the first half, although neither side was able to gain any real control in a lifeless opening session. Eight minutes into the second half, Stanić was felled by an innocuous challenge from Schmeichel and Šuker made no mistake from the penalty spot. Denmark came close to equalizing three times in the next twenty minutes, but Croatia always looked the most dangerous as they repeatedly broke from defense. With nine minutes left, just such a break ended in a second Croatian goal when Boban finished off another superb Šuker move upfield. Four minutes later, Šuker almost scored an amazing goal when, from the halfway line, he managed to loft a shot over Schmeichel, who backpedalled frantically to prevent the goal. But in the last minute, the Danish keeper charged up to the center circle and was made to pay for his rashness when Šuker nonchalantly chipped the ball over him as he scrambled back into position.

 

GROUP STAGE

STADIUM: Saint James' Park (Newcastle)

DATE: 18-06-1996 (16:30 h)

ATTENDANCE: 26.976

REFEREE: Dermot Gallagher (ENG)

GOALS: 1-0 (Blanc 21'); 2-0 (Penev [o.g.] 63'); 2-1 (Stoichkov 69'); 3-1 (Loko 90')

[Incidents: The referee was injured in minute 28 and Paul Durkin (also from England) substituted him.]

FRA

France

France - Bulgaria

България

BUL

3-1 (1-0)

FRANCE

Lama

Thuram, Blanc, Desailly, Lizarazu

Karembeu, Deschamps (c), Guérin

Djorkaeff, Dugarry (Loko 70'), Zidane (Pedros 62')

COACH: Aimé Jacquet

BULGARIA

Mikhajlov (c)

Kremenliev, Khubchev, Ivanov, Tsvetanov

Lechkov, Yankov (Borimirov 79'), Balăkov (Donkov 82'), Yordanov

Stoichkov, Penev

COACH: Dimităr Penev

GAME SUMMARY

France were determined to get their revenge on Bulgaria, who denied them a place in the 1994 World Cup Finals when they snatched a last-minute victory in Paris in November 1993. The game began in an uncompromising way when Desailly was booked in only the second minute for a vicious challenge on Stoichkov, and fortunate as he was to avoid a red card, he pointed the way for the rest of the French team. After an early spell of Bulgarian pressure, France took the lead in the 21st minute when Blanc headed in a corner kick and this gave them the edge that they had been seeking. With Stoichkov shackled by Desailly, Bulgaria struggled to get back into an increasingly niggling game and France had little difficulty in controlling the play. In minute 63, just after the disappointing Zidane had been substituted, France went further ahead when Penev headed a Djorkaeff free kick past his own goalkeeper. Although Stoichkov pulled one back six minutes later with a superb free kick, France remained in control and, in the dying seconds, Loko made it 3-1 and ensured the progression of both France and Spain to the quarterfinals.

 

GROUP STAGE

STADIUM: Elland Road (Leeds)

DATE: 18-06-1996 (16:30 h)

ATTENDANCE: 32.719

REFEREE: Ahmet Çakar (TUR)

GOALS: 0-1 (Manjarín 11'); 1-1 (Răducioiu 29'); 1-2 (Amor 84')

[Incidents: The Romanian captain Gheorghe Hagi played his international game number 100.]

ROM

România

Romania - Spain

España

SPA

1-2 (1-1)

ROMANIA

Prunea

Petrescu, Doboş, Prodan (Lupescu 86'), Selymes

Stîngă, Popescu, Hagi (c), Gâlcă, Ilie (Munteanu 66')

Răducioiu (Vlădoiu 77')

COACH: Anghel lordănescu

SPAIN

Zubizarreta (c)

López, Alkorta, Abelardo (Amor 64'), Sergi

Manjarín, Hierro, Nadal, Amavisca (Guerrero 72')

Kiko, Pizzi (Alfonso 57')

COACH: Javier Clemente

GAME SUMMARY

Spain were the first team to get off the mark when Manjarín scored somewhat luckily in minute 11, as a through ball ricocheted off Pizzi’s heel into his path. Romania held on as Spain controlled the game for the next quarter and, prompted by Hagi, came back with a 29th minute equalizer through Răducioiu. Thereafter, Spain continued to press for the winner that would put them through into the next round, but without creating a great deal of chances. In the last minutes of the game, when the pressure on the Romanian defense was most intense, the Spanish efforts were rewarded when an injured defender lying in the penalty area played Sergi onside, and his cross was knocked by Alfonso to Amor, who headed the ball into the Romanian net.

 

GROUP STAGE

STADIUM: Villa Park (Birmingham)

DATE: 18-06-1996 (19:30 h)

ATTENDANCE: 34.926

REFEREE: Václav Krondl (CZR)

GOALS: 1-0 (McCoist 36')

SCO

Scotland

Scotland - Switzerland

Schweiz / Suisse

SWI

1-0 (1-0)

SCOTLAND

Goram

Burley, Calderwood, Hendry, Boyd

McCall, McAllister (c), Collins, T. McKinlay (Booth 60')

Durie, McCoist (Spencer 84')

COACH: Craig Brown

SWITZERLAND

Pascolo

Hottiger, Vega, Henchoz, Quentin (Comisetti 81')

Vogel, Sforza (c), Koller (Wicky 46')

Türkyılmaz, Bonvin, Chapuisat (Fournier 46')

COACH: Artur Jorge Braga

GAME SUMMARY

Scotland began the match in dominating form and would have been 2-0 up if McCoist had converted the two easy chances which fell to him early in the game. In fact, despite their pressure and dominance, the Scottish lack of bite up front left them rueing the absence of their injured striker Duncan Ferguson, whose presence could have made all the difference. McCoist eventually scored in minute 36 from a much harder chance than those he had already missed.

 

In the second half, with news of England’s 4-0 lead over Holland filtering through from London, Scotland were momentarily qualified for the next round, and their players seemed to step down a gear, still spurning chances to go further ahead. However, after the Dutch goal in Wembley, Scotland failed to score one more goal which would have put them through.

 

GROUP STAGE

STADIUM: Wembley (London)

DATE: 18-06-1996 (19:30 h)

ATTENDANCE: 76.798

REFEREE: Gerd Grabher (AUT)

GOALS: 0-1 (Shearer [p.] 23'); 0-2 (Sheringham 51'); 0-3 (Shearer 57'); 0-4 (Sheringham 62'); 1-4 (Kluivert 78')

NED

Nederland

Netherlands - England

England

ENG

1-4 (0-1)

NETHERLANDS

Van der Sar

Bogarde, Blind (c), Reiziger

Winter, Seedorf, De Boer (Cocu 73'), Witschge (De Kock 46')

Cruijff, Bergkamp, Hoekstra (Kluivert 73')

COACH: Guus Hiddink

ENGLAND

Seaman

G. Neville, Southgate, Adams (c), Pearce

McManaman, Gascoigne, Ince (Platt 68'), Anderton

Sheringham (Fowler 76'), Shearer (Barmby 76')

COACH: Terry Venables

GAME SUMMARY

England turned in one of their finest displays for years against a Dutch team who started well but crumbled under the English attacking onslaught. Shearer had a shot cleared off the line in the eighth minute and was a constant threat. After 22 minutes, Ince broke through the Dutch defense into the penalty area and was tripped by Blind. The Austrian referee immediately pointed to the penalty spot and Shearer made no mistake with the kick. Minutes later, Sheringham forced a save from Van der Sar and then Holland had a brief attacking spell when Bergkamp, Witschge and Seedorf all had chances to level the score. As the game progressed, England took complete control of the midfield and threatened to overrun the Dutch defense, who struggled to hold the score to 1-0 at halftime.

 

In the first quarter of an hour of the second half, the English attack moved up a gear and in a ten minute spell rocked Holland with three brilliantly taken goals. Six minutes into the half, Sheringham headed the first from a Gascoigne corner, and a few minutes later Shearer made it 3-0 when Gascoigne and Sheringham combined on the left opening up the Dutch defense. Sheringham scored his second when Van der Sar was unable to hold a shot by Anderton, and the 4-0 scoreline left Holland facing elimination from the tournament. Hiddink brought on Kluivert and Cocu trying to make his team react but, perhaps more significantly, the substitution by Venables of Shearer and Sheringham had a greater effect on the outcome. With neither Fowler nor Barmby posing much of a threat to the Dutch defense, their attack came into their own and Holland pulled a goal back through Kluivert in minute 78. The score remained 4-1 and Holland’s fate rested in the hands of Scotland and Switzerland, who were playing in Birmingham at the same time. In the end, the Dutch qualified ahead of Scotland on goal average.

 

GROUP STAGE

STADIUM: City Ground (Nottingham)

DATE: 19-06-1996 (16:30 h)

ATTENDANCE: 20.484

REFEREE: Bernd Heynemann (GER)

GOALS: 0-1 (Figo 4'); 0-2 (João Pinto 33'); 0-3 (Domingos 82')

CRO

Hrvatska

Croatia - Portugal

Portugal

POR

0-3 (0-2)

CROATIA

Mrmić

Bilić, Pavličić, Soldo, Jarni (c)

Šimić, Mladenović (Boban 46'), Jurčević, Prosinečki (Asanović 46')

Pamić (Šuker 46'), Vlaović

COACH: Miroslav Blažević

PORTUGAL

Vítor Baía (c)

Secretário, Fernando Couto, Hélder, Dimas

João Pinto, Oceano, Paulo Sousa (Tavares 70'), Figo

Sá Pinto (Domingos 46'), Rui Costa (Pedro Barbosa 61')

COACH: António Oliveira

GAME SUMMARY

Already certain of reaching the quarterfinals, Croatia fielded no fewer than seven reserves against Portugal, and their lacklustre performance was a reflection of this policy. Figo gave Portugal a fourth-minute lead and the Croatians could not compete with the fired-up Portuguese. With better finishing, Portugal could have been four goals up within half an hour but, as it was, they had to wait until minute 33 for their second goal, scored by right winger João Pinto. At halftime, Croatia brought on three substitutes, Asanović, Šuker and Boban, but the game was already as good as lost with the buoyant Portuguese well in control. The Croats created a few openings, but it was the Portuguese who retained the initiative and deservedly scored a third goal in minute 82, converted by Domingos.

 

GROUP STAGE

STADIUM: Hillsborough (Sheffield)

DATE: 19-06-1996 (16:30 h)

ATTENDANCE: 28.951

REFEREE: Nikolaj Levnikov (RUS)

GOALS: 0-1 (B. Laudrup 50'); 0-2 (A. Nielsen 69'); 0-3 (B. Laudrup 84')

TUR

Türkiye

Turkey - Denmark

Danmark

DEN

0-3 (0-0)

TURKEY

ş

Vedat, Recep (c) (Bülent 68'), Tugay, Ogün, Alpay

Tayfun, Abdullah, Orhan (Saffet 68')

Hami, Hakan Şükür (Arif 46')

COACH: Fatih Terim

DENMARK

Schmeichel

Thomsen, J. Høgh, Rieper

Helveg, A.Nielsen, M.Laudrup (c), B.Nielsen, Schjønberg (Larsen 46')

B. Laudrup, E. Andersen (S. Andersen 88')

COACH: Richard Møller Nielsen

GAME SUMMARY

The Turkish lack of firepower was again in evidence against Denmark, who cruised to an untroubled 0-0 halftime scoreline. After the break, as news of Portugal’s 2-0 lead filtered through, Denmark moved up a gear and took the lead through Brian Laudrup in minute 50. Further goals followed from Allan Nielsen and Brian Laudrup again as Denmark gave the disappointed Turks a lesson in finishing. In the end, the holders 3-0 victory did them credit, although they were out of the tournament after the victory of Portugal over Croatia in the other group match.

 

GROUP STAGE

STADIUM: Anfield (Liverpool)

DATE: 19-06-1996 (19:30 h)

ATTENDANCE: 21.128

REFEREE: Anders Frisk (SWE)

GOALS: 0-1 (Suchopárek 5'); 0-2 (Kuka 19'); 1-2 (Mostovoj 49'); 2-2 (Tetradze 54'); 3-2 (Beschastnykh 85'); 3-3 (Šmicer 88')

RUS

Россия

Russia - Czech Republic

Česká Republika

CZR

3-3 (0-2)

RUSSIA

Cherchesov

Tetradze, Gorlukovich, Nikiforov, Yanovskij

Karpin (c), Radimov, Khokhlov, Tsymbalar’ (Shalimov 67')

Kolyvanov (Beschastnykh 46'), Simutenkov (Mostovoj 46')

COACH: Oleg Romantsev

CZECH REPUBLIC

Kouba

Látal, Suchopárek, Kubík (c), Horňák, Nedvěd

Berger (Němeček 90'), Bejbl, Poborský, Němec

Kuka (Šmicer 69')

COACH: Dušan Uhrin

GAME SUMMARY

The Czech Republic completely dominated the first half and took a fifth minute lead when Suchopárek headed in a corner. Kuka made it 2-0 in the 19th minute, and the Czechs could have extended their lead later on, but had some shots ricocheted off the bar. Russia made two substitutions at halftime and one of these, Mostovoj, took only four minutes to put them back in the game. Five minutes later, Tetradze levelled the scores and the Russians themselves started to control the game. The Czech Republic responded by bringing on Šmicer in place of Kuka but, although they went close to regaining the lead, it was another Russian substitute, Beschastnykh, who broke the deadlock with a long-range shot in minute 85. The Czechs were only too well aware that they had to score to stand a chance of qualifying, and they threw everything into the attack. Then, with only two minutes left, their gamble paid off when Šmicer scored a late equalizer and the fate of the Czech Republic and Italy was decided.

 

GROUP STAGE

STADIUM: Old Trafford (Manchester)

DATE: 19-06-1996 (19:30 h)

ATTENDANCE: 53.740

REFEREE: Guy Goethals (BEL)

GOALS: -

[Incidents: Zola missed a penalty shot (min. 8), saved by Köpke. Strunz was sent off (min. 59).]

ITA

Italia

Italy - Germany

Deutschland

GER

0-0 (0-0)

ITALY

Peruzzi

Mussi, Costacurta, Maldini (c), Carboni (Torricelli 76')

Fuser (Di Livio 81'), Albertini, Di Matteo (Chiesa 67'), Donadoni

Casiraghi, Zola

COACH: Arrigo Sacchi

GERMANY

Köpke

Strunz, Freund, Sammer, Helmer, Ziege

Möller (Bode 89'), Eilts, Häßler

Klinsmann (c), Bobič

COACH: Berti Vogts

GAME SUMMARY

Italy played their best football of the tournament, but where unable to get the win they needed to qualify. After coming close in the sixth minute, Italy were awarded a penalty two minutes later when Köpke brought down Casiraghi in the area. The Italians argued—with justification—that the German keeper should be sent off, but the Belgian referee merely booked him. To add insult to the Italian injury, Köpke saved Zola’s spot-kick with a brilliant dive to his left. Later on, as the Italians completely dominated the game, Köpke was instrumental in preventing Italy from scoring. Even when Strunz was sent off on the hour, they were unable to score the vital goal the needed to qualify, and the goalless draw at the end of the match, combined with the score in the other group match, sealed the fate of Italy in the competition.

 

1/4 FINAL

STADIUM: Wembley (London)

DATE: 22-06-1996 (15:00 h)

ATTENDANCE: 75.440

REFEREE: Marc Batta (FRA)

GOALS: -

BOOKED: G. Neville (47’) / Abelardo (1’), Belsué (40’), Alfonso (50’)

PK: 1-0 (Shearer); 1-0 (Hierro [out]) / 2-0 (Platt); 2-1 (Amor) / 3-1 (Pearce); 3-2 (Belsué) / 4-2 (Gascoigne); 4-2 (Nadal [saved])

ENG

England

England - Spain

España

SPA

0-0 (0-0;0-0) (pk: 4-2)

ENGLAND

Seaman

G. Neville, Southgate, Adams (c), Pearce

McManaman (Barmby 109'), Platt, Gascoigne, Anderton (Stone 109')

Sheringham (Fowler 109'), Shearer

COACH: Terry Venables

SPAIN

Zubizarreta (c)

Belsué, Alkorta (López 72'), Nadal, Abelardo, Sergi

Manjarín (Caminero 46'), Hierro, Amor

Kiko, Julio Salinas (Alfonso 46')

COACH: Javier Clemente

GAME SUMMARY

England had the first clear chance of the game when, in only the third minute, Shearer broke into the penalty area and struck a fine shot toward the corner of the net which Zubizarreta, somehow, managed to turn for a corner. But Spain were quite untroubled by this start and quickly settled into an easy pace, coping without difficulty with the few attacks which England were able to muster. As their confidence rose, Spain took control and created all sorts of problems for the English defense. On two occasions the ball was into the English net—firstly through Kiko and then via Julio Salinas—but both efforts were controversially ruled offside. In minute 40, Seaman was forced to take on the role of sweeper when he hurtled out of his area and tackled Manjarín, who had broken clear, and England were fortunate indeed to be level and with equal numbers at the break.

 

Spain introduced two substitutes at the start of the second half, Caminero and Alfonso, and they clearly took control of the game. That England survived the continuing Spanish onslaught was due more to questionable refereeing decisions than to any change on their part, as Spain should have been awarded at least two penalties. Seaman saved England on a number of occasions and, although Shearer should have scored twice when presented with easy chances, the hosts were relieved when the full-time whistle blew.

 

In order to encourage teams to attack for the winner and avoid the prospect of sterile defending waiting for the penalty shoot-out, UEFA had decided that extra-time would be played under the sudden death “Golden Goal” rule. But in the first competition game when this new rule was applied the result was not as expected, because in the whole of the first period of extra-time only two half chances were created—both by England. In the second half, Terry Venables brought on three substitutes, Barmby, Fowler and Stone, but, again, no real chances were created, and the game headed into a penalty shoot-out. Shearer scored the first kick and Hierro hit the bar with his shot. All the players scored their penalties until Nadal’s shot was saved by Seaman, and England qualified for the semifinals against the run of play.

 

1/4 FINAL

STADIUM: Anfield (Liverpool)

DATE: 22-06-1996 (18:30 h)

ATTENDANCE: 37.465

REFEREE: Antonio Jesús López Nieto (SPA)

GOALS: -

BOOKED: Deschamps (7’), Karembeu (48’) / De Kock (68’), Kluivert (89’), Bogarde (90’)

PK: 0-1 (De Kock); 1-1 (Zidane) / 1-2 (De Boer); 2-2 (Djorkaeff) / 2-3 (Kluivert); 3-3 (Lizarazu) / 3-3 (Seedorf [saved]); 4-3 (Guérin) / 4-4 (Blind); 5-4 (Blanc)

FRA

France

France - Netherlands

Nederland

NED

0-0 (0-0;0-0) (pk: 5-4)

FRANCE

Lama

Thuram, Desailly, Blanc, Lizarazu

Karembeu, Deschamps (c), Guérin

Djorkaeff, Loko (Dugarry 61' (Pedros 80')), Zidane

COACH: Aimé Jacquet

NETHERLANDS

Van der Sar

Reiziger, De Kock, Blind (c), Bogarde

Cocu, De Boer, Witschge (Mulder 80')

Cruijff (Winter 69'), Kluivert, Bergkamp (Seedorf 60')

COACH: Guus Hiddink

GAME SUMMARY

The quarterfinal game between France and Netherlands, two of the favorites to win the tournament, turned out to be a disappointing contest as the Dutch defense completely shackled the French lightweight attack to produce a goalless draw. Neither side came near to scoring until the last few minutes of regulation, when Cocu’s free kick was deflected against the French post by Blanc. As in the first quarterfinal, the extra-time was a sterile period in spite of the “Golden Goal” rule, and only Djorkaeff came close to scoring, so the outcome of the match was down to penalties. Seedorf failed to score the fourth Dutch kick and Blanc converted the last French one to send his country into the semifinals.

 

1/4 FINAL

STADIUM: Old Trafford (Manchester)

DATE: 23-06-1996 (15:00 h)

ATTENDANCE: 43.412

REFEREE: Leif Sundell (SWE)

GOALS: 1-0 (Klinsmann [p.] 20'); 1-1 (Šuker 51'); 2-1 (Sammer 59')

BOOKED: Sammer (5’), Klinsmann (7’) / Štimac (17'), Štimac (56’ > RC)

[Incidents: Štimac was sent off after a second bookable offense (min. 56).]

GER

Deutschland

Germany - Croatia

Hrvatska

CRO

2-1 (1-0)

GERMANY

Köpke

Reuter, Babbel, Sammer, Helmer, Ziege

Möller, Eilts, Scholl (Häßler 88')

Klinsmann (c) (Freund 39'), Bobič (Kuntz 46')

COACH: Berti Vogts

CROATIA

Ladić

Stanić, Bilić, Jerkan, Štimac, Jarni

Jurčević (Mladenović 78'), Boban (c), Asanović

Šuker, Vlaović

COACH: Miroslav Blažević

GAME SUMMARY

Right from the start, Germany and Croatia engaged in a very physical contest. The harsh treatment meted out by the Croatians was met in kind by the Germans, and the game developed into the most bad-tempered match of the whole tournament. Klinsmann was the main target of the indisciplined Croatian play (with both on and off-the-ball challenges), but ironically it was the German striker who was booked for retaliation. However, thirteen minutes later Klinsmann put Germany ahead when he converted a penalty after a foul on Sammer. To complete an eventful first half, Klinsmann had to leave the field six minutes from halftime due to injury. The other German attacker, Bobič, also went off injured during the break as a result of Croatia’s violent play.

 

The Croatian tactics seemed to pay off when Šuker equalized six minutes into the second half, and Germany, without their two injured attackers, reeled as Croatia assumed the upper hand. But five minutes later everything changed with the dismissal of Štimac. In spite of the Croatian hard play, Štimac was the only player to be booked, but unfortunately for him and his team he was shown two yellow cards. Almost immediately Sammer made it 2-1 for Germany and Croatia’s hopes of victory faded as they went to pieces and should have had further players dismissed for violent conduct. Although the Croatians created some more chances, their hot-headed players squandered them and Germany finished easy—if somewhat battered and bruised—winners.

 

1/4 FINAL

STADIUM: Villa Park (Birmingham)

DATE: 23-06-1996 (18:30 h)

ATTENDANCE: 26.832

REFEREE: Hellmut Krug (GER)

GOALS: 0-1 (Poborský 53')

BOOKED: Hélder (10’), Sá Pinto (40’), Secretário (59’), João Pinto (90’) / Suchopárek (1’), Šmicer (23’), Látal (43'), Bejbl (55’), Kuka (69’), Látal (82’ > RC)

[Incidents: Látal was sent off after a second bookable offense (min. 82).]

POR

Portugal

Portugal - Czech Republic

Česká Republika

CZR

0-1 (0-0)

PORTUGAL

Vítor Baía (c)

Secretário, Fernando Couto, Hélder, Dimas

João Pinto, Oceano (A. Folha 65'), Paulo Sousa, Figo (Cadete 82')

Rui Costa, Sá Pinto (Domingos 46')

COACH: António Oliveira

CZECH REPUBLIC

Kouba

Látal, Horňák, Kadlec, Suchopárek, Němec

Poborský, Bejbl, Němeček (c) (Berger 90+'), Šmicer (Kubík 85')

Kuka

COACH: Dušan Uhrin

GAME SUMMARY

In a game which cannot be labelled as violent, the high number of cards shown by the German referee (as many as nine players were booked and one of them was sent off) spoiled the spectacle. After a goalless first half, in which Portugal had the better of the few chances that were created, the deadlock was broken in minute 53, when Poborský broke through a gap on the left and, with the angle narrowed by the advancing goalkeeper and defender, cheekily scooped the ball over their heads into the net. Thereafter, the Portuguese pressed for an equalizer, but were easily contained by the well-organized Czech defense and midfield. With eight minutes left, Látal was questionably dismissed for a second bookable offense, but even with ten men the Czech Republic were little troubled by Portugal, who were unable to create a single clear-cut chance to equalize.

 

1/2 FINAL

STADIUM: Old Trafford (Manchester)

DATE: 26-06-1996 (16:00 h)

ATTENDANCE: 43.877

REFEREE: Leslie Mottram (SCO)

GOALS: -

BOOKED: Thuram (43’), Roche (50’), Lizarazu (64’) / Nedvěd (77’), Němeček (83’), Kubík (97’)

PK: 1-0 (Zidane); 1-1 (Kubík) / 2-1 (Djorkaeff); 2-2 (Nedvěd) / 3-2 (Lizarazu); 3-3 (Berger) / 4-3 (Guérin); 4-4 (Poborský) / 5-4 (Blanc); 5-5 (Rada) / [decisive shots] 5-5 (Pedros [saved]); 5-6 (Kadlec)

FRA

France

France - Czech Republic

Česká Republika

CZR

0-0 (0-0;0-0) (pk: 5-6)

FRANCE

Lama

Thuram (Angloma 83'), Blanc (c), Roche, Lizarazu

Lamouchi (Pedros 62'), Desailly, Guérin

Djorkaeff, Loko, Zidane

COACH: Aimé Jacquet

CZECH REPUBLIC

Kouba

Horňák, Kadlec, Rada, Němec (Kubík 84')

Nedvěd, Němeček (c), Novotný, Šmicer (Berger 46')

Poborský, Drulák (Kotůlek 70')

COACH: Dušan Uhrin

GAME SUMMARY

In one of the dreariest games of the whole tournament, the Czech Republic qualified for the final on penalty kicks after a goalless draw with France. The Czechs, who were without four key players for booking suspension (Látal, Suchopárek, Bejbl and Kuka), could be forgiven for their defensiveness, but the French had no excuses. As it was, neither side so much as had a shot on target in the first boring 45 minutes, and more of the same followed after the break. Berger, who had been unwell, came on as substitute for Šmicer at halftime, and he was one of the few players who tried to attack with some intensity. However, as the full-time whistle blew, neither side had come near to scoring.

 

In extra-time, few chances were created and both sides seemed intent on holding out for penalties, which duly arrived. After each team had taken and scored their first series of five penalties, Pedros’s shot was saved by Kouba and everything rested on the sixth Czech penalty. But the Czech Republic seemed to have no contingency plans for other penalty-takers and Kubík (who had taken the first shot) came forward, but was sent away by the Scottish referee. Finally, it was Kadlec the player who stepped forward and crashed the ball into the net to send the surprising Czech Republic into the final.

 

1/2 FINAL

STADIUM: Wembley (London)

DATE: 26-06-1996 (19:30 h)

ATTENDANCE: 75.862

REFEREE: Sándor Puhl (HUN)

GOALS: 1-0 (Shearer 3'); 1-1 (Kuntz 16')

BOOKED: Gascoigne (73’) / Reuter (46’), Möller (80’)

PK: 1-0 (Shearer); 1-1 (Häßler) / 2-1 (Platt); 2-2 (Strunz) / 3-2 (Pearce); 3-3 (Reuter) / 4-3 (Gascoigne); 4-4 (Ziege) / 5-4 (Sheringham); 5-5 (Kuntz) // [decisive shots] 5-5 (Southgate [saved]); 5-6 (Möller)

[Incidents: Reuter and Möller are suspended for the final after completing their cycle of two yellow cards in the competition.]

ENG

England

England - Germany

Deutschland

GER

1-1 (1-1;1-1) (pk: 5-6)

ENGLAND

Seaman

Pearce, Adams (c), Southgate

Anderton, Gascoigne, Ince, Platt, McManaman

Shearer, Sheringham

COACH: Terry Venables

GERMANY

Köpke

Reuter, Helmer (Bode 110'), Sammer, Babbel, Ziege

Freund (Strunz 118'), Möller (c), Eilts

Scholl (Häßler 77'), Kuntz

COACH: Berti Vogts

GAME SUMMARY

England got off to a great start when Shearer headed them into the lead in only the third minute. To their credit, Germany were unperturbed by this early setback and quickly settled down, playing attractive possession football from midfield. In the 16th minute, Helmer’s cross was rammed home by Kuntz for the equalizer. Both defenses were playing well and neither side was able to dictate the play in an open attractive match. Shearer continued in fine form and was a constant source of worry to the German defense, going close to score in minutes 24 and 44 with fierce headers.

 

After the break, England took control of the game for half and hour with both Ince and Gascoigne going close, and Germany were fortunate to remain in the game and hold on till the end of regulation. Extra-time started more positively when, in the second minute, Anderton’s shot hit the German post and bounced back into the arms of Köpke. Play immediately swung to the other end and Kuntz headed in from a corner, only to have his goal disallowed for an infringement. At the other end, Gascoigne was centimeters away from scoring on two occasions, and both sides made it a really thrilling end to the game by going all out for the winner. The score remained 1-1 after the extra-time and the inevitable penalty shoot-out followed. After each side had taken and scored their first series of five penalties, Southgate’s shot was saved by Köpke and Möller scored the decisive penalty to qualify Germany for yet another major final.

 

FINAL

STADIUM: Wembley (London)

DATE: 30-06-1996 (19:00 h)

ATTENDANCE: 73.611

REFEREE: Pierluigi Pairetto (ITA)

GOALS: 0-1 (Berger [p.] 59’); 1-1 (Bierhoff 73’); 2-1 (Bierhoff [Golden Goal] 95’)

BOOKED: Helmer (63’), Sammer (69’), Ziege (91’) / Horňák (47’)

[Incidents: For the first time in the history of the European Championship, the “Golden Goal” rule (or sudden death) applied in a final: in order to encourage attacking play during the extra-time and avoid the prospect of sterile defending waiting for the penalty shoot-out, the first team to score a goal in this additional period would become the winner, with no need to play the remaining time. So, when Bierhoff scored his second goal in minute 5 of extra-time, the game was over and Germany became European champions. This goal was controversial, however, as the linesman raised his flag to signal a positional offside by Kuntz. Although all the German players were celebrating their victory, Pairetto talked with his assistant and decided that this offside wasn't influential on the play, so he didn't disallow the goal.]

GER

Deutschland

Germany - Czech Republic

Česká Republika

CZR

2-1 (0-0;1-1)

GERMANY

Köpke

Strunz, Babbel, Sammer, Helmer, Ziege

Scholl (Bierhoff 69’), Eilts (Bode 46’), ßler

Kuntz, Klinsmann (c)

COACH: Berti Vogts

CZECH REPUBLIC

Kouba

Horňák, Rada, Kadlec (c), Suchopárek, Němec

Bejbl, Nedvěd, Berger

Poborský (Šmicer 88’), Kuka

COACH: Dušan Uhrin

GAME SUMMARY

The final arrived amidst much media criticism of Germany, who had applied for—and being given permission to—bringing two extra players into their squad after the injuries of Basler and Kohler. Berti Vogts defused this criticism firstly by sending for only one player (Jens Todt) and then by deciding against including him in the team line-up or amongst the named substitutes.

 

In a largely uneventful first half, in which the Germans pressed and the Czechs defended in numbers and broke from the back, it was the Czech Republic the first to show when Poborský, at full stretch, shot just wide of the German post. Five minutes later Ziege headed over from a corner, and no real chances were then created until just after the half-hour, when Kuntz had a shot cleared by the Czech fullback Rada. The game was being a trial of patience in every sense. Just before halftime, both keepers saved their sides when, within a space of a minute, each dived bravely at the feet of the advancing forward.

 

At the start of the second half, Bode replaced the injured Eilts and the resultant reorganization of the German midfield gave them an edge, which they had lacked in the first half. The Czechs, however, weathered a brief German attack and for a quarter of an hour dominated play. Köpke came to the rescue of Germany when he dived full-length to stop a deflected shot from Berger, but in minute 59 the lively Poborský was brought down in the area by Sammer and Berger made no mistake with the penalty kick. It seemed that a shock was on the cards and the underdogs Czech Republic could emulate Denmark’s feat of 1992. However, if there is a resilient team, famous for their amazing comebacks in high competition, that is Germany. Berti Vogts made an inspired substitution and sent on Bierhoff, who demonstrated his power in the air almost immediately. Ziege’s free kick from deep on the right was in the air a long time, but Kouba did not come out, allowing Bierhoff to tower over him and head in. After the equalizer, it was all Germany domination for a spell. Two minutes from the end of regulation, Dušan Uhrin brought Šmicer on for Poborský, and in the final minute he seemed to have won the game when he sent a cracking shot goalward, but Köpke dived full-length and finger-tipped the ball around the post. After that, the Italian referee Mr. Pairetto blew for full-time.

 

Extra-time began quietly and ended after only five minutes when Bierhoff scored Germany’s second goal. After all the extra-times earlier in the tournament, this was the first senior international match to be decided by a “Golden Goal”. On the edge of the area with his back to goal, Bierhoff turned and hit a very average left-footer which hit Horňák on its way through to Kouba, but the Czech goalkeeper allowed the ball to slip through his fingers and drop gently in off the far post. Ignoring his linesman’s flag for positional offside against Kuntz, the referee ruled that Bierhoff’s shot should stand. Germany thus became the first country to win the championship three times, while for the Czech Republic it was sudden death to an unexpected run.

 

 

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